Methods for estimation of disparities in medication use in an observational cohort study

Results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Robyn L. Mcclelland, Neal W. Jorgensen, Wendy S Post, Moyses Szklo, Richard A. Kronmal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Evaluating disparities in health care is an important aspect of understanding differences in disease risk. The purpose of this study is to describe the methodology for estimating such disparities, with application to a large multi-ethnic cohort study. Methods: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis includes 6814 participants aged 45-84years free of cardiovascular disease. Prevalence ratio (PR) regression was used to model baseline lipid lowering medication (LLM) or anti-hypertensive medication use at baseline as a function of gender, race, risk factors, and estimated pre-treatment biomarker values. Results: Hispanics and African Americans had lower prevalence of medication use than did non-Hispanic whites, even at the same risk factor profile. This became non-significant after adjusting for socioeconomic status. Although gender did not influence the prevalence of LLM use (PR=1.09, 95%CI 0.95-1.25), there were differences in the association of diabetes and HDL with LLM use by gender. Men were significantly less likely to be on anti-hypertensive medications than women (PR=0.86, 95%CI 0.80-0.92, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-541
Number of pages9
JournalPharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Observational Studies
Atherosclerosis
Cohort Studies
Lipids
Antihypertensive Agents
Healthcare Disparities
Hispanic Americans
Social Class
African Americans
Cardiovascular Diseases
Biomarkers
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anti-hypertensives
  • Disparities
  • Medication
  • Pharmacoepidemiology
  • Statins
  • Statistical methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Methods for estimation of disparities in medication use in an observational cohort study : Results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. / Mcclelland, Robyn L.; Jorgensen, Neal W.; Post, Wendy S; Szklo, Moyses; Kronmal, Richard A.

In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Vol. 22, No. 5, 05.2013, p. 533-541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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