Method of glomerular filtration rate estimation affects prediction of mortality risk

Brad C. Astor, Andrew S. Levey, Lesley A. Stevens, Frederick Van Lente, Elizabeth Selvin, Josef Coresh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Decreased kidney function, determined using a serum creatinine-based estimation of GFR, is associated with a higher risk for mortality from cardiovascular disease. Equations incorporating cystatin C improve the estimation of GFR, but whether this improves the prediction of risk for mortality is unknown. We measured cystatin C on 6942 adult participants in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Linked Mortality File, including all participants who had high serum creatinine (>1.2 mg/dl for men; >1.0 mg/dl for women) or were older than 60 yr and 25% random sample of participants who were younger than 60 yr. We estimated GFR using equations that included standardized serum creatinine, cystatin C, or both. Participant data were linked to the National Death Index. A total of 1573 (22.7%) deaths (713 deaths from cardiovascular disease) occurred during a median of 8 yr. Lower estimated GFR based on cystatin C was strongly associated with higher risk for overall and cardiovascular mortality across the range of normal to moderately decreased estimated GFR. Creatinine-based estimates of GFR resulted in weaker associations, with the association between estimated GFR and all-cause mortality reversed at higher levels of estimated GFR. An equation using both creatinine and cystatin C (in addition to age, race, and gender) resulted in weaker associations than equations using only cystatin C (with or without age, race, and gender). In conclusion, despite better performance in terms of estimating GFR, equations based on both cystatin C and creatinine do not predict mortality as well as equations based on cystatin C alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2214-2222
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume20
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

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Cystatin C
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Creatinine
Mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases
Serum
Nutrition Surveys
Reference Values
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Method of glomerular filtration rate estimation affects prediction of mortality risk. / Astor, Brad C.; Levey, Andrew S.; Stevens, Lesley A.; Van Lente, Frederick; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef.

In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 20, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 2214-2222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Astor, Brad C. ; Levey, Andrew S. ; Stevens, Lesley A. ; Van Lente, Frederick ; Selvin, Elizabeth ; Coresh, Josef. / Method of glomerular filtration rate estimation affects prediction of mortality risk. In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 2009 ; Vol. 20, No. 10. pp. 2214-2222.
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