Method choice, intent, and gender in completed suicide

Diane G. Denning, Yeates Cowell, Deborah King, Christopher Cox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Women who commit suicide use less violent methods, such as drugs and carbon monoxide poisoning, than do men, who more often use violent methods such as guns and hanging. Theories that attempt to explain this finding focus on gender differences in suicidal intent, socialization, emotions, interpersonal relationships, orientation and access to methods, and neurobiological factors. Data from a psychological autopsy study were used to test the theory that women who commit suicide use less violent means because they are less intent on dying. Although women were significantly less likely to use a violent method than men, there was no difference in the lethality of their suicidal intent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)282-288
Number of pages7
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume30
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Suicide
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Socialization
Firearms
Autopsy
Emotions
Psychology
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Method choice, intent, and gender in completed suicide. / Denning, Diane G.; Cowell, Yeates; King, Deborah; Cox, Christopher.

In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, Vol. 30, No. 3, 2000, p. 282-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Denning, DG, Cowell, Y, King, D & Cox, C 2000, 'Method choice, intent, and gender in completed suicide', Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 282-288.
Denning, Diane G. ; Cowell, Yeates ; King, Deborah ; Cox, Christopher. / Method choice, intent, and gender in completed suicide. In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior. 2000 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 282-288.
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