Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus colonization and risk of subsequent infection in critically ill children: Importance of preventing nosocomial methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus transmission

Aaron Milstone, Brian W. Goldner, Tracy Ross, John W. Shepard, Karen C Carroll, Trish M. Perl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background.Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization is a predictor of subsequent infection in hospitalized adults. The risk of subsequent MRSA infections in hospitalized children colonized with MRSA is unknown.Methods.Children admitted to an academic medical center's pediatric intensive care unit between March 2007 and March 2010 were included in the study. Anterior naris swabs were cultured to identify children with MRSA colonization at admission. Laboratory databases were queried and National Healthcare Safety Network definitions applied to identify patients with MRSA infections during their hospitalization or after discharge.Results.The MRSA admission prevalence among 3140 children was 4.9%. Overall, 56 children (1.8%) developed an MRSA infection, including 13 (8.5%) colonized on admission and 43 (1.4%) not colonized on admission (relative risk [RR], 5.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4-10.1). Of those, 10 children (0.3%) developed an MRSA infection during their hospitalization, including 3 of 153 children (1.9%) colonized on admission and 7 of 2987 children (0.2%) not colonized on admission (RR, 8.4; 95% CI, 2.7-25.8). African-Americans and those with public health insurance were more likely to get a subsequent infection (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)853-859
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume53
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2011

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

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