Methadone treatment induces attenuation of cerebrovascular deficits associated with the prolongedabuse of cocaine and heroin

Ronald I. Herning, Warren E. Better, Kimberly Tate, Annie Umbricht, Kenzie L. Preston, Jean L. Cadet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Opiate replacement therapy has been usefulin reducing heroin use and in keeping patients in treatment programs. However, neuropsychologicalandneurophysiologicaleffects of this treatment regimen have not been evaluated systematically. To determinewhether methadone treatment reduces the magnitude of cerebralbloodfow alternations in polysubstance (heroin and cocaine) abusers, we compared blood fow parameters in controlsubjects (n = 26), polysubstance abusers (n = 28) maintained on methadone for 24weeks, and polysubstance abusers (n = 22) who were not seeking treatment. Blood fow velocity was recorded from the anterior andmiddle cerebralarteries using transcranialDopplersonography on an outpatient visit. The pulsatility index, a measure of cerebrovascularresistance, was significantly (p<0.05) increased in both groups of polysubstance abusers compared to controlsubjects. Increasedpulsatility in the two groups of substance abusers suggests constriction of the smallcorticalarteries. Nevertheless, the methadone-maintained polysubstance abusers had significantly lower pulsatility values than the nontreatment substance-abusing group. These findingssuggest that maintenance on methadone might have significant beneficialneurovascular effects on this population of patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-568
Number of pages7
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2003

Keywords

  • Cerebralperfusion
  • Cerebrovascular resistance
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methadone
  • Polysubstance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Methadone treatment induces attenuation of cerebrovascular deficits associated with the prolongedabuse of cocaine and heroin'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this