Meta-analysis: Vitamin D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

M. Eliades, E. Spyrou, N. Agrawal, Mariana Lazo-Elizondo, F. L. Brancati, James John Potter, A. A. Koteish, Jeanne Clark, Eliseo Guallar, R. Hernaez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a highly prevalent condition. Emerging evidence suggests that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Aim To review systematically the association between vitamin D levels, measured as serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D], and NAFLD. Methods We used PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify all studies that assessed the association between vitamin D and NAFLD up until 22 April 2013, without language restrictions. We included studies that compared vitamin D levels between NAFLD cases and controls and also those that compared the odds of vitamin D deficiency by NAFLD status. Pooled standardised differences and odds ratios were calculated using an inverse variance method. Results Seventeen cross-sectional and case-control studies have evaluated the association between vitamin D and NAFLD. NAFLD was diagnosed using biopsy (4 studies), ultrasound or CT (10 studies) and liver enzymes (3 studies). Nine studies provided data for a quantitative meta-analysis. Compared to controls, NAFLD patients had 0.36 ng/mL (95% CI: 0.32, 0.40 ng/mL) lower levels of 25(OH)D and were 1.26 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (OR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.17, 1.35). Conclusions NAFLD patients have decreased serum 25(OH)D concentrations, suggesting that vitamin D may play a role in the development of NAFLD. The directionality of this association cannot be determined from cross-sectional studies. Demonstration of a causal role of hypovitaminosis D in NAFLD development in future studies could have important therapeutic implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-254
Number of pages9
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

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Vitamin D
Meta-Analysis
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Vitamin D Deficiency
Serum
PubMed
Case-Control Studies
Language
Cross-Sectional Studies
Odds Ratio
Databases
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Meta-analysis : Vitamin D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. / Eliades, M.; Spyrou, E.; Agrawal, N.; Lazo-Elizondo, Mariana; Brancati, F. L.; Potter, James John; Koteish, A. A.; Clark, Jeanne; Guallar, Eliseo; Hernaez, R.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 38, No. 3, 08.2013, p. 246-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eliades, M. ; Spyrou, E. ; Agrawal, N. ; Lazo-Elizondo, Mariana ; Brancati, F. L. ; Potter, James John ; Koteish, A. A. ; Clark, Jeanne ; Guallar, Eliseo ; Hernaez, R. / Meta-analysis : Vitamin D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2013 ; Vol. 38, No. 3. pp. 246-254.
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abstract = "Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a highly prevalent condition. Emerging evidence suggests that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Aim To review systematically the association between vitamin D levels, measured as serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D], and NAFLD. Methods We used PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify all studies that assessed the association between vitamin D and NAFLD up until 22 April 2013, without language restrictions. We included studies that compared vitamin D levels between NAFLD cases and controls and also those that compared the odds of vitamin D deficiency by NAFLD status. Pooled standardised differences and odds ratios were calculated using an inverse variance method. Results Seventeen cross-sectional and case-control studies have evaluated the association between vitamin D and NAFLD. NAFLD was diagnosed using biopsy (4 studies), ultrasound or CT (10 studies) and liver enzymes (3 studies). Nine studies provided data for a quantitative meta-analysis. Compared to controls, NAFLD patients had 0.36 ng/mL (95{\%} CI: 0.32, 0.40 ng/mL) lower levels of 25(OH)D and were 1.26 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (OR 1.26, 95{\%} CI: 1.17, 1.35). Conclusions NAFLD patients have decreased serum 25(OH)D concentrations, suggesting that vitamin D may play a role in the development of NAFLD. The directionality of this association cannot be determined from cross-sectional studies. Demonstration of a causal role of hypovitaminosis D in NAFLD development in future studies could have important therapeutic implications.",
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AU - Lazo-Elizondo, Mariana

AU - Brancati, F. L.

AU - Potter, James John

AU - Koteish, A. A.

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AU - Hernaez, R.

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N2 - Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a highly prevalent condition. Emerging evidence suggests that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Aim To review systematically the association between vitamin D levels, measured as serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D], and NAFLD. Methods We used PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify all studies that assessed the association between vitamin D and NAFLD up until 22 April 2013, without language restrictions. We included studies that compared vitamin D levels between NAFLD cases and controls and also those that compared the odds of vitamin D deficiency by NAFLD status. Pooled standardised differences and odds ratios were calculated using an inverse variance method. Results Seventeen cross-sectional and case-control studies have evaluated the association between vitamin D and NAFLD. NAFLD was diagnosed using biopsy (4 studies), ultrasound or CT (10 studies) and liver enzymes (3 studies). Nine studies provided data for a quantitative meta-analysis. Compared to controls, NAFLD patients had 0.36 ng/mL (95% CI: 0.32, 0.40 ng/mL) lower levels of 25(OH)D and were 1.26 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (OR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.17, 1.35). Conclusions NAFLD patients have decreased serum 25(OH)D concentrations, suggesting that vitamin D may play a role in the development of NAFLD. The directionality of this association cannot be determined from cross-sectional studies. Demonstration of a causal role of hypovitaminosis D in NAFLD development in future studies could have important therapeutic implications.

AB - Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a highly prevalent condition. Emerging evidence suggests that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Aim To review systematically the association between vitamin D levels, measured as serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D], and NAFLD. Methods We used PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify all studies that assessed the association between vitamin D and NAFLD up until 22 April 2013, without language restrictions. We included studies that compared vitamin D levels between NAFLD cases and controls and also those that compared the odds of vitamin D deficiency by NAFLD status. Pooled standardised differences and odds ratios were calculated using an inverse variance method. Results Seventeen cross-sectional and case-control studies have evaluated the association between vitamin D and NAFLD. NAFLD was diagnosed using biopsy (4 studies), ultrasound or CT (10 studies) and liver enzymes (3 studies). Nine studies provided data for a quantitative meta-analysis. Compared to controls, NAFLD patients had 0.36 ng/mL (95% CI: 0.32, 0.40 ng/mL) lower levels of 25(OH)D and were 1.26 times more likely to be vitamin D deficient (OR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.17, 1.35). Conclusions NAFLD patients have decreased serum 25(OH)D concentrations, suggesting that vitamin D may play a role in the development of NAFLD. The directionality of this association cannot be determined from cross-sectional studies. Demonstration of a causal role of hypovitaminosis D in NAFLD development in future studies could have important therapeutic implications.

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