Met and Unmet Needs for Assistance and Quality of Life for People with Severe and Persistent Mental Disorders

Elizabeth A. Skinner, Donald M. Steinwachs, Kathleen Handley, Anthony Lehman, Maureen Fahey, C. Alan Lyles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

People with severe mental illnesses often require help not only with managing their illness, but with a broad array of social and domestic activities. The impacts of the presence of such needs in several domains of function on quality of life ratings in the same domains are assessed using data from a survey of Maryland Medicaid recipients who have severe and persistent mental disorders. Measures included self-report of need and whether help was received for it, and Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. The presence of need was associated with lower quality of life ratings, and met needs improved those ratings relative to unmet need. A current diagnosis of depression resulted in lower quality of life, but successful treatment raised scores significantly. These findings underscore the potential impact the mental health service system can have on the quality of the lives of people it serves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-118
Number of pages10
JournalMental Health Services Research
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Major depression
  • Need and unmet need
  • Quality of life
  • Schizophrenia
  • Serious and persistent mental disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Met and Unmet Needs for Assistance and Quality of Life for People with Severe and Persistent Mental Disorders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this