Mentalizing and motivation neural function during social interactions in autism spectrum disorders

Michal Assaf, Christopher J. Hyatt, Christina G. Wong, Matthew R. Johnson, Robert T. Schultz, Talma Hendler, Godfrey D. Pearlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are characterized by core deficits in social functions. Two theories have been suggested to explain these deficits: mind-blindness theory posits impaired mentalizing processes (i.e. decreased ability for establishing a representation of others' state of mind), while social motivation theory proposes that diminished reward value for social information leads to reduced social attention, social interactions, and social learning. Mentalizing and motivation are integral to typical social interactions, and neuroimaging evidence points to independent brain networks that support these processes in healthy individuals. However, the simultaneous function of these networks has not been explored in individuals with ASDs. We used a social, interactive fMRI task, the Domino game, to explore mentalizing- and motivation-related brain activation during a well-defined interval where participants respond to rewards or punishments (i.e. motivation) and concurrently process information about their opponent's potential next actions (i.e. mentalizing). Thirteen individuals with high-functioning ASDs, ages 12-24, and 14 healthy controls played fMRI Domino games against a computer-opponent and separately, what they were led to believe was a human-opponent. Results showed that while individuals with ASDs understood the game rules and played similarly to controls, they showed diminished neural activity during the human-opponent runs only (i.e. in a social context) in bilateral middle temporal gyrus (MTG) during mentalizing and right Nucleus Accumbens (NAcc) during reward-related motivation (Pcluster <0.05 FWE). Importantly, deficits were not observed in these areas when playing against a computer-opponent or in areas related to motor and visual processes. These results demonstrate that while MTG and NAcc, which are critical structures in the mentalizing and motivation networks, respectively, activate normally in a non-social context, they fail to respond in an otherwise identical social context in ASD compared to controls. We discuss implications to both the mind-blindness and social motivation theories of ASD and the importance of social context in research and treatment protocols.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-331
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroImage: Clinical
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Theory of Mind
Interpersonal Relations
Motivation
Reward
Nucleus Accumbens
Temporal Lobe
Blindness
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Aptitude
Punishment
Brain
Clinical Protocols
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Human Activities
Neuroimaging
Action Potentials
Research

Keywords

  • Middle temporal gyrus
  • Nucleus accumbens
  • Reward
  • Theory of mind

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Assaf, M., Hyatt, C. J., Wong, C. G., Johnson, M. R., Schultz, R. T., Hendler, T., & Pearlson, G. D. (2013). Mentalizing and motivation neural function during social interactions in autism spectrum disorders. NeuroImage: Clinical, 3, 321-331. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2013.09.005

Mentalizing and motivation neural function during social interactions in autism spectrum disorders. / Assaf, Michal; Hyatt, Christopher J.; Wong, Christina G.; Johnson, Matthew R.; Schultz, Robert T.; Hendler, Talma; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

In: NeuroImage: Clinical, Vol. 3, 2013, p. 321-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Assaf, M, Hyatt, CJ, Wong, CG, Johnson, MR, Schultz, RT, Hendler, T & Pearlson, GD 2013, 'Mentalizing and motivation neural function during social interactions in autism spectrum disorders', NeuroImage: Clinical, vol. 3, pp. 321-331. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2013.09.005
Assaf, Michal ; Hyatt, Christopher J. ; Wong, Christina G. ; Johnson, Matthew R. ; Schultz, Robert T. ; Hendler, Talma ; Pearlson, Godfrey D. / Mentalizing and motivation neural function during social interactions in autism spectrum disorders. In: NeuroImage: Clinical. 2013 ; Vol. 3. pp. 321-331.
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