Mental Health Emergency Detentions and Access to Firearms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most persons with mental illness are never violent. However, during certain high-risk periods, small subgroups of individuals with serious mental illness are at increased risk of violence. We review epidemiologic evidence, federal law, and a recent case addressing whether persons subject to emergency mental health detentions constitutionally can be denied firearm ownership.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-78
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Law, Medicine and Ethics
Volume43
Issue numbers1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Firearms
Mental Health
Emergencies
Ownership
Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects

Cite this

Mental Health Emergency Detentions and Access to Firearms. / Vernick, Jon S; McGinty, Emma Beth; Rutkow, Helaine.

In: Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Vol. 43, No. s1, 01.03.2015, p. 76-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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