Memory Self-Efficacy and Performance Differences in Young and Old Adults: The Effect of Mnemonic Training

George Rebok, Laurie J. Balcerak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We evaluated the hypothesis that mnemonic training would result in higher memory self-efficacy and better memory performance in young and old adults. Forty-eight young adults (17- to 19-year-olds) and 45 old adults (60- to 78-year-olds) received either training in the method of loci or no training and were given either performance feedback or no feedback on a serial-word recall task. Ss were tested at pre- and posttraining and were asked to rate their self-efficacy strength (SEST) and self-efficacy level (SEL) at each test session. Young adults recalled more than old adults and had higher self-efficacy scores. Training with feedback improved recall performance in both age groups but failed to increase SEST or SEL. When SEL scores were used to derive a measure of prediction inaccuracy, no age differences were observed. We conclude that efficacy expectations and attributions for memory performance may influence mnemonic training outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)714-721
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume25
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1989

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Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Young Adult
Learning
performance
young adult
age difference
attribution
age group
Age Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Memory Self-Efficacy and Performance Differences in Young and Old Adults : The Effect of Mnemonic Training. / Rebok, George; Balcerak, Laurie J.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 09.1989, p. 714-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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