Medical student healthcare consulting groups: A novel way to train the next generation of physician-executives

Esther Y. Hsiang, Andrew G. Breithaupt, Peiyi Su, Andrew T. Rogers, Niv Milbar, Sanjay Virendra Desai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Meeting the challenges of the evolving healthcare environment requires leadership of physicians well-trained in clinical medicine and healthcare management. However, many physicians lack training in business and leadership. While some residency programs have management tracks, training at the medical school level is currently lacking. We developed the Hopkins Health Management Advisory Group, an extracurricular program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine that exposes medical students to healthcare management and fosters development of leadership skills. Teams of students work directly with health system executives on 3–6 month-long projects using management consulting principles to address problems spanning health system domains, including strategy, operations, and quality improvement. Since the program’s inception, 23 students have completed seven projects, with 13 additional students currently working on three more projects. Sponsors leading six out of seven completed projects have implemented recommendations. Qualitative survey respondents have found the program beneficial, with students frequently describing how the program has helped to develop professional skills and foster knowledge about healthcare management. These early assessments show positive impact for both students and the institution, and suggest that such programs can train students in management early and concurrently in their medication education by immersing them in team-based health system projects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalMedical Teacher
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 13 2017

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management counsulting
medical student
physician
management
Group
student
leadership
health
medicine
project management
health promotion
school
medication
lack
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Medical student healthcare consulting groups : A novel way to train the next generation of physician-executives. / Hsiang, Esther Y.; Breithaupt, Andrew G.; Su, Peiyi; Rogers, Andrew T.; Milbar, Niv; Desai, Sanjay Virendra.

In: Medical Teacher, 13.10.2017, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsiang, Esther Y. ; Breithaupt, Andrew G. ; Su, Peiyi ; Rogers, Andrew T. ; Milbar, Niv ; Desai, Sanjay Virendra. / Medical student healthcare consulting groups : A novel way to train the next generation of physician-executives. In: Medical Teacher. 2017 ; pp. 1-4.
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