Medical illness burden, trait neuroticism, and depression in older primary care patients

Jeffrey M. Lyness, Paul R. Duberstein, Deborah A. King, Christopher Cox, Eric D. Caine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The authors tested the hypotheses that medical illness burden is independently associated with depression and that this association is moderated by neuroticism. Method: Multiple regression techniques were used to determine the independent associations of medical burden and neuroticism with depression in a group of 196 subjects, 60 years of age and older, recruited from primary care settings. Results: Medical burden and neuroticism were independently associated with major depression, depressive symptoms, and psychiatric dysfunction. Conclusions: These findings support models in which medical disorders may contribute directly to depression. At the same time, the role of neuroticism in later-life depression warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)969-971
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume155
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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