Medical cure of apparent brain abscesses

M. B. Rennels, C. L. Woodward, W. L. Robinson, M. T. Gumbinas, Joel Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two children with apparent brain abscesses were cured with antibiotic therapy. Review of the literature reveals clinical and experimental evidence that both cerebritis and an encapsulated abscess may appear as an enhancing ring lesion on cranial computed tomography. Patients reported to have had brain abscesses cured without surgery actually may have had cerebritis. There are only preliminary hints as to how to differentiate patients with cerebritis from those with an abscess. More experience is necessary to develop criteria to determine which patients may be appropriately treated with antibiotic therapy alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-224
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume72
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Brain Abscess
Abscess
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Tomography
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Rennels, M. B., Woodward, C. L., Robinson, W. L., Gumbinas, M. T., & Brenner, J. (1983). Medical cure of apparent brain abscesses. Pediatrics, 72(2), 220-224.

Medical cure of apparent brain abscesses. / Rennels, M. B.; Woodward, C. L.; Robinson, W. L.; Gumbinas, M. T.; Brenner, Joel.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 72, No. 2, 1983, p. 220-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rennels, MB, Woodward, CL, Robinson, WL, Gumbinas, MT & Brenner, J 1983, 'Medical cure of apparent brain abscesses', Pediatrics, vol. 72, no. 2, pp. 220-224.
Rennels MB, Woodward CL, Robinson WL, Gumbinas MT, Brenner J. Medical cure of apparent brain abscesses. Pediatrics. 1983;72(2):220-224.
Rennels, M. B. ; Woodward, C. L. ; Robinson, W. L. ; Gumbinas, M. T. ; Brenner, Joel. / Medical cure of apparent brain abscesses. In: Pediatrics. 1983 ; Vol. 72, No. 2. pp. 220-224.
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