Medicaid expansions for pregnant women and infants: Easing hospitals' uncompensated care burdens?

L. C. Dubay, S. A. Norton, M. Moon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hospitals' bad debt and charity care increased by nearly 30% between 1987 and 1990. However, beginning in 1987, federal legislation expanded Medicaid eligibility to pregnant women and infants with family incomes up to 133% of the federal poverty level, and gave states the option to extend coverage up to 185% of poverty. These expansions likely reduced the need for free hospital care. Controlling for other factors associated with provision of uncompensated care, this analysis shows the Medicaid expansions reduced uncompensated care by roughly 5.4%. For hospitals with a significant commitment to maternity and infant care, the burdens of uncompensated care were 28.5% lower than they would have been without the expansions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-344
Number of pages13
JournalInquiry (United States)
Volume32
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

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