Medial temporal lobe structures and hippocampal subfields in psychotic disorders: Findings from the bipolar-schizophrenia network on intermediate phenotypes (B-SNIP) study

Ian Mathew, Tova M. Gardin, Neeraj Tandon, Shaun Eack, Alan N. Francis, Larry J. Seidman, Brett Clementz, Godfrey D. Pearlson, John A. Sweeney, Carol A. Tamminga, Matcheri S. Keshavan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    IMPORTANCE Structural alterations in the hippocampus and other medial temporal lobe regions have been observed in schizophrenia. How these alterations and hippocampal subfields might differ across the psychosis spectrum remains unclear. OBJECTIVES To characterize medial temporal lobe structures, including hippocampal subfields, usingmagnetic resonance imaging and to examine their relation to psychosis and cognitive function across the psychosis spectrum. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Case-control, cross-sectional neuroimaging study in a large series of probands with psychotic disorders and healthy volunteers as part of the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP). Patients with psychotic disorders (schizophrenia, n = 219; schizoaffective disorder, n = 142; and psychotic bipolar disorder, n = 188) and healthy controls (n = 337) were recruited across ambulatory clinics at university health centers in the B-SNIP consortium. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Medial temporal lobe and hippocampal subfieldswere quantified with an automated parcellation approach using FreeSurfer software. Memory and other cognitive parameters were assessed using standardized neuropsychological tests. RESULTS Hippocampal volume reductions were seen in all 3 diagnostic groups when compared with healthy controls; alterations in the entorhinal cortex and parahippocampal regions were limited to schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders (P < .001). Smaller volumes across the hippocampal subfields were seen in all 3 psychotic disorders, with the most prominent differences being in cornu ammonis 2/3 (P < .001). Hippocampal volumes were positively correlated with psychosis severity, declarative memory, and overall cognitive performance (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Alterations in the hippocampuswere evident across psychotic disorders. Hippocampal subfields that participate in memory-related processes supporting pattern separation and pattern completion might be abnormal and may underlie the pathophysiology of psychosis.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)769-777
    Number of pages9
    JournalJAMA psychiatry
    Volume71
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 2014

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health

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  • Cite this

    Mathew, I., Gardin, T. M., Tandon, N., Eack, S., Francis, A. N., Seidman, L. J., Clementz, B., Pearlson, G. D., Sweeney, J. A., Tamminga, C. A., & Keshavan, M. S. (2014). Medial temporal lobe structures and hippocampal subfields in psychotic disorders: Findings from the bipolar-schizophrenia network on intermediate phenotypes (B-SNIP) study. JAMA psychiatry, 71(7), 769-777. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.453