Mechanisms of hypoxic neurodegeneration in the developing brain

Michael V Johnston, Wako Nakajima, Henrik Hagberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Asphyxia and other insults to the developing brain are responsible for several human neurodevelopmental disorders. The pattern of neonatal brain injury differs from that seen in the adult nervous system, and there are wide differences in regional vulnerability. Recent evidence suggests that two events that contribute to this pattern of selective vulnerability are developmental changes in excitatory glutamate-containing neurotransmitter circuits and the propensity for immature neurons to die by apoptosis rather than necrosis. Developmental up-regulation of NMDA receptors with enhanced function and increased expression of caspase-3 at critical periods in development are linked to these mechanisms. Although these molecular changes enhance the developing brain's capacity for plasticity by helping to prune redundant synapses and neurons, they can become "Achilles heels" in the face of a brain energy crisis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-220
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroscientist
Volume8
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Brain
Neurons
Asphyxia
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Caspase 3
Synapses
Brain Injuries
Nervous System
Neurotransmitter Agents
Glutamic Acid
Necrosis
Up-Regulation
Apoptosis
Critical Period (Psychology)
Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Keywords

  • Caspase
  • Glutamate
  • Hypoxia
  • Neonate
  • NMDA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Mechanisms of hypoxic neurodegeneration in the developing brain. / Johnston, Michael V; Nakajima, Wako; Hagberg, Henrik.

In: Neuroscientist, Vol. 8, No. 3, 2002, p. 212-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnston, MV, Nakajima, W & Hagberg, H 2002, 'Mechanisms of hypoxic neurodegeneration in the developing brain', Neuroscientist, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 212-220.
Johnston, Michael V ; Nakajima, Wako ; Hagberg, Henrik. / Mechanisms of hypoxic neurodegeneration in the developing brain. In: Neuroscientist. 2002 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 212-220.
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