Mechanisms of Eosinophilia in the Pathogenesis of Hypereosinophilic Disorders

Steven J. Ackerman, Bruce S. Bochner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The increased numbers of activated eosinophils in the blood and tissues that typically accompany hypereosinophilic disorders result from a variety of mechanisms. Exciting advances in translating discoveries achieved from mouse models and molecular strategies to the clinic have led to a flurry of new therapeutics specifically designed to target eosinophil-associated diseases. So far, this form of hypothesis testing in humans in vivo through pharmacology generally has supported the paradigms generated in vitro and in animal models, raising hopes that a spectrum of novel therapies soon may become available to help those who have eosinophil-associated diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-375
Number of pages19
JournalImmunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

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Eosinophilia
Eosinophils
Molecular Models
Animal Models
Pharmacology
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Mechanisms of Eosinophilia in the Pathogenesis of Hypereosinophilic Disorders. / Ackerman, Steven J.; Bochner, Bruce S.

In: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America, Vol. 27, No. 3, 08.2007, p. 357-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ackerman, Steven J. ; Bochner, Bruce S. / Mechanisms of Eosinophilia in the Pathogenesis of Hypereosinophilic Disorders. In: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America. 2007 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 357-375.
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