Mechanics of the lung in the 20th century

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Major advances in respiratory mechanics occurred primarily in the latter half of the 20th century, and this is when much of our current understanding was secured. The earliest and ancient investigations involving respiratory physiology and mechanics were frequently done in conjunction with other scientific activities and often lacked the ability to make quantitative measurements. This situation changed rapidly in the 20th century, and this relatively recent history of lung mechanics has been greatly influenced by critical technological advances and applications, which have made quantitative experimental testing of ideas possible. From the spirometer of Hutchinson, to the pneumotachograph of Fleisch, to the measurement of esophageal pressure, to the use of the Wilhelmy balance by Clements, and to the unassuming strain gauges for measuring pressure and rapid paper and electronic chart recorders, these enabling devices have generated numerous quantitative experimental studies with greatly increased physiologic understanding and validation of mechanistic theories of lung function in health and disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2009-2027
Number of pages19
JournalComprehensive Physiology
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

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Respiratory Mechanics
Mechanics
Respiratory Physiological Phenomena
Pressure
Lung
Equipment and Supplies
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Mechanics of the lung in the 20th century. / Mitzner, Wayne A.

In: Comprehensive Physiology, Vol. 1, No. 4, 10.2011, p. 2009-2027.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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