Mechanical ventilation in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mechanical ventilation provides life-sustaining support for most patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome; however, traditional approaches to mechanical ventilation may cause ventilator-associated lung injury, which could exacerbate or perpetuate respiratory failure caused initially by conditions such as pneumonia, sepsis, and trauma. This article reviews the theory, laboratory data, and results of recent clinical trials that suggest that modified ventilator strategies can reduce ventilator-associated lung injury and improve clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-510
Number of pages20
JournalClinics in Chest Medicine
Volume21
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Acute Lung Injury
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Mechanical Ventilators
Artificial Respiration
Lung Injury
Respiratory Insufficiency
Sepsis
Pneumonia
Clinical Trials
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Mechanical ventilation in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. / Brower, Roy G; Fessler, Henry Eric.

In: Clinics in Chest Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2000, p. 491-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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