Measuring diet quality in China: The INFH-UNC-CH diet quality index

J. D. Stookey, Youfa Wang, K. Ge, H. Lin, B. M. Popkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This paper describes the development and efficacy of a diet quality index (DQI) for China. Design: The Dietary Guidelines for Chinese Residents motivated the selection of 10 DQI components. These components were weighted and assigned cut-offs and point schemes based on the Chinese Food Guide Pagoda, Chinese and/or international dietary reference values. The efficacy of resulting DQI scores was assessed relative to a priori expectations. Subjects: The Chinese DQI was evaluated using cross-sectional 3 day diet record and anthropometric data on 7450 adults from the 1991 China Health and Nutrition Survey. Methods: For each individual, a DQI total score was calculated as the sum of components, and DQI pattern scores calculated to reflect the underlying composition of diet quality problems. The DQI scores were compared with component scores, food and nutrient intake, weight status and sociodemographic variables. Results: The total DQI score simultaneously represented all component aspects of diet quality as well as micronutrients not explicitly built into the index. The total DQI score was significantly correlated with food and nutrient intakes, BMI, urban residence and income. The DQI pattern scores correlated with DQI components and weight status as expected. Conclusions: The China DQI captures variation along several components of diet quality, appears sensitive to under- and overnutrition, as well as sociodemographic variables. The China DQI may prove useful for monitoring the nutrition transition and epidemiologic trends in China.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)811-821
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume54
Issue number11
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

nutritional adequacy
China
Diet
nutrient intake
Food
food intake
Eating
nutrition monitoring
food guides
Overnutrition
Dietary Reference Intakes
Diet Records
Weights and Measures
Nutrition Policy
Dietary Guidelines
Nutrition Surveys
Micronutrients
Health Surveys
dietary minerals
Malnutrition

Keywords

  • China
  • Diet quality
  • Dietary intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Stookey, J. D., Wang, Y., Ge, K., Lin, H., & Popkin, B. M. (2000). Measuring diet quality in China: The INFH-UNC-CH diet quality index. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 54(11), 811-821.

Measuring diet quality in China : The INFH-UNC-CH diet quality index. / Stookey, J. D.; Wang, Youfa; Ge, K.; Lin, H.; Popkin, B. M.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 54, No. 11, 2000, p. 811-821.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stookey, JD, Wang, Y, Ge, K, Lin, H & Popkin, BM 2000, 'Measuring diet quality in China: The INFH-UNC-CH diet quality index', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 54, no. 11, pp. 811-821.
Stookey, J. D. ; Wang, Youfa ; Ge, K. ; Lin, H. ; Popkin, B. M. / Measuring diet quality in China : The INFH-UNC-CH diet quality index. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 54, No. 11. pp. 811-821.
@article{d141e79627664f23bbb306a11db89ebc,
title = "Measuring diet quality in China: The INFH-UNC-CH diet quality index",
abstract = "Objective: This paper describes the development and efficacy of a diet quality index (DQI) for China. Design: The Dietary Guidelines for Chinese Residents motivated the selection of 10 DQI components. These components were weighted and assigned cut-offs and point schemes based on the Chinese Food Guide Pagoda, Chinese and/or international dietary reference values. The efficacy of resulting DQI scores was assessed relative to a priori expectations. Subjects: The Chinese DQI was evaluated using cross-sectional 3 day diet record and anthropometric data on 7450 adults from the 1991 China Health and Nutrition Survey. Methods: For each individual, a DQI total score was calculated as the sum of components, and DQI pattern scores calculated to reflect the underlying composition of diet quality problems. The DQI scores were compared with component scores, food and nutrient intake, weight status and sociodemographic variables. Results: The total DQI score simultaneously represented all component aspects of diet quality as well as micronutrients not explicitly built into the index. The total DQI score was significantly correlated with food and nutrient intakes, BMI, urban residence and income. The DQI pattern scores correlated with DQI components and weight status as expected. Conclusions: The China DQI captures variation along several components of diet quality, appears sensitive to under- and overnutrition, as well as sociodemographic variables. The China DQI may prove useful for monitoring the nutrition transition and epidemiologic trends in China.",
keywords = "China, Diet quality, Dietary intake",
author = "Stookey, {J. D.} and Youfa Wang and K. Ge and H. Lin and Popkin, {B. M.}",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "811--821",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0954-3007",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measuring diet quality in China

T2 - The INFH-UNC-CH diet quality index

AU - Stookey, J. D.

AU - Wang, Youfa

AU - Ge, K.

AU - Lin, H.

AU - Popkin, B. M.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Objective: This paper describes the development and efficacy of a diet quality index (DQI) for China. Design: The Dietary Guidelines for Chinese Residents motivated the selection of 10 DQI components. These components were weighted and assigned cut-offs and point schemes based on the Chinese Food Guide Pagoda, Chinese and/or international dietary reference values. The efficacy of resulting DQI scores was assessed relative to a priori expectations. Subjects: The Chinese DQI was evaluated using cross-sectional 3 day diet record and anthropometric data on 7450 adults from the 1991 China Health and Nutrition Survey. Methods: For each individual, a DQI total score was calculated as the sum of components, and DQI pattern scores calculated to reflect the underlying composition of diet quality problems. The DQI scores were compared with component scores, food and nutrient intake, weight status and sociodemographic variables. Results: The total DQI score simultaneously represented all component aspects of diet quality as well as micronutrients not explicitly built into the index. The total DQI score was significantly correlated with food and nutrient intakes, BMI, urban residence and income. The DQI pattern scores correlated with DQI components and weight status as expected. Conclusions: The China DQI captures variation along several components of diet quality, appears sensitive to under- and overnutrition, as well as sociodemographic variables. The China DQI may prove useful for monitoring the nutrition transition and epidemiologic trends in China.

AB - Objective: This paper describes the development and efficacy of a diet quality index (DQI) for China. Design: The Dietary Guidelines for Chinese Residents motivated the selection of 10 DQI components. These components were weighted and assigned cut-offs and point schemes based on the Chinese Food Guide Pagoda, Chinese and/or international dietary reference values. The efficacy of resulting DQI scores was assessed relative to a priori expectations. Subjects: The Chinese DQI was evaluated using cross-sectional 3 day diet record and anthropometric data on 7450 adults from the 1991 China Health and Nutrition Survey. Methods: For each individual, a DQI total score was calculated as the sum of components, and DQI pattern scores calculated to reflect the underlying composition of diet quality problems. The DQI scores were compared with component scores, food and nutrient intake, weight status and sociodemographic variables. Results: The total DQI score simultaneously represented all component aspects of diet quality as well as micronutrients not explicitly built into the index. The total DQI score was significantly correlated with food and nutrient intakes, BMI, urban residence and income. The DQI pattern scores correlated with DQI components and weight status as expected. Conclusions: The China DQI captures variation along several components of diet quality, appears sensitive to under- and overnutrition, as well as sociodemographic variables. The China DQI may prove useful for monitoring the nutrition transition and epidemiologic trends in China.

KW - China

KW - Diet quality

KW - Dietary intake

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033677630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033677630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11114674

AN - SCOPUS:0033677630

VL - 54

SP - 811

EP - 821

JO - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0954-3007

IS - 11

ER -