Measuring communicative performance with the FAPCI instrument: Preliminary results from normal hearing and cochlear implanted children

James H. Clark, Pooja Aggarwal, Nae Yuh Wang, Raymond Robinson, John K. Niparko, Frank R. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective:: To develop preliminary " growth curves" of Functioning after Pediatric Cochlear Implantation (FAPCI) scores using a cross-sectional sample of normal hearing children and to compare these curves to trajectories of FAPCI scores in children receiving cochlear implants. Methods:: Quantile regression was used to develop growth curves from the FAPCI scores of a cross-sectional sample of 82 normal hearing children (age range 7 months-5 years). Trajectories of FAPCI scores from a longitudinal cohort of 75 children with cochlear implants (age range 1-5 years) were compared to these growth curves. Results:: FAPCI scores were positively associated with increasing age in normal hearing children with a rapid increase in scores observed at earlier ages followed by a plateau at age 3 years. FAPCI trajectories for cochlear-implanted children varied with age at implantation and did not reach a plateau until age 5-6 years. Conclusion:: Normal hearing children demonstrated increasing FAPCI scores with age, and these preliminary growth curves allow for the interpretation of a cochlear-implanted child's FAPCI scores in comparison to normal hearing children. Additional research using a larger, longitudinal cohort of normal hearing children will be needed to develop definitive normative FAPCI trajectories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-553
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • Cochlear implantation
  • Communicative performance
  • FAPCI
  • Pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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