Measles virus infection in rhesus macaques: Altered immune responses and comparison of the virulence of six different virus strains

Paul G Auwaerter, Paul A. Rota, William R. Elkins, Robert John Adams, Tracy DeLozier, Yaqing Shi, William J. Bellini, Brian R. Murphy, Diane Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Measles remains a major cause of childhood mortality, with questions about virus virulence and pathogenesis still requiring answers. Rhesus macaques were infected with 5 different culture-adapted strains of measles virus, including 2 from patients with progressive vaccine-induced disease, and a sixth nonculture-adapted strain, Bilthoven. All caused infection detectable by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and induction of antibody. Chicago-1 and Bilthoven induced viremias detectable by leukocyte cocultivation. Bilthoven induced Koplik's spots, conjunctivitis, and rash. Lymphopenia and depressed interleukin (IL)-2 production were followed by monocytosis and eosinophilia. All monkeys, including 41 involved in a primate facility outbreak, showed suppressed responses to phytohemagglutinin. As the rash resolved production of IL-2, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, and IL-5 mRNA increased. Monkeys are useful for studies of measles immunopathogenesis, but virus strains must be carefully chosen. Increased virulence of vaccine strains isolated from immunocompromised infants with fatal infections was not evident.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)950-958
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume180
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

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Measles virus
Virus Diseases
Exanthema
Macaca mulatta
Interleukin-2
Haplorhini
Virulence
Exanthema Subitum
Vaccines
Viruses
Lymphopenia
Conjunctivitis
Viremia
Interleukin-5
Measles
Eosinophilia
Phytohemagglutinins
Coculture Techniques
Infection
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Measles virus infection in rhesus macaques : Altered immune responses and comparison of the virulence of six different virus strains. / Auwaerter, Paul G; Rota, Paul A.; Elkins, William R.; Adams, Robert John; DeLozier, Tracy; Shi, Yaqing; Bellini, William J.; Murphy, Brian R.; Griffin, Diane.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 180, No. 4, 1999, p. 950-958.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Auwaerter, Paul G ; Rota, Paul A. ; Elkins, William R. ; Adams, Robert John ; DeLozier, Tracy ; Shi, Yaqing ; Bellini, William J. ; Murphy, Brian R. ; Griffin, Diane. / Measles virus infection in rhesus macaques : Altered immune responses and comparison of the virulence of six different virus strains. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 180, No. 4. pp. 950-958.
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