Maximum Aortic Valve Opening Phase for Annulus Sizing in Pre-TAVR CTA

Nam Ju Lee, Saurabh Jha, Bong Ju Lee, Harold Litt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives The optimal phase for the measurement of the aortic annular area for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is not standardized, although most agree that systolic measurements are preferred, when the annulus is larger. We hypothesized that the maximum annular area occurs at the cardiac phase of the maximum aortic valve opening (MAVO) and that this phase can be accurately and reproducibly assessed by visual inspection only. Materials and Methods The aortic valve opening area was inspected visually by two readers to determine the MAVO phase. The annular area was measured at the MAVO phase and the typical systolic phase (35% of the R-R interval). Differences in the annular area that would change valve sizing for prostheses were noted. Results Fifty patients (mean age 81) were studied. Ninety percent had the MAVO at the 15%–25% R-R interval. There was high interobserver correlation (0.89) for determining the MAVO phase by visual inspection. For 49 out of 50 patients, the annular area was maximal at the MAVO phase. The mean difference in the annular area between the MAVO phase and 35% was 22.3 (±4.57) mm2. In 12% of the patients, the difference in the annular area changed the recommended size of a self-expanding prosthesis and would have altered the procedure in 32% for balloon-expandable prostheses. Conclusions Visually assessed MAVO occurs in early systole for most patients and is almost always the cardiac phase of the maximal aortic annular area. This method allows rapid and reproducible determination of the appropriate phase for TAVR planning measurements. Consideration should be given to optimizing pre-TAVR computed tomography acquisitions for early systolic reconstruction and visual determination of the MAVO.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1064-1069
Number of pages6
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Aortic Valve
Prostheses and Implants
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
Systole
Tomography

Keywords

  • aortic annulus
  • computed tomography
  • Transcatheter aortic valve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Maximum Aortic Valve Opening Phase for Annulus Sizing in Pre-TAVR CTA. / Lee, Nam Ju; Jha, Saurabh; Lee, Bong Ju; Litt, Harold.

In: Academic Radiology, Vol. 24, No. 9, 01.09.2017, p. 1064-1069.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Nam Ju ; Jha, Saurabh ; Lee, Bong Ju ; Litt, Harold. / Maximum Aortic Valve Opening Phase for Annulus Sizing in Pre-TAVR CTA. In: Academic Radiology. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 1064-1069.
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abstract = "Rationale and Objectives The optimal phase for the measurement of the aortic annular area for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is not standardized, although most agree that systolic measurements are preferred, when the annulus is larger. We hypothesized that the maximum annular area occurs at the cardiac phase of the maximum aortic valve opening (MAVO) and that this phase can be accurately and reproducibly assessed by visual inspection only. Materials and Methods The aortic valve opening area was inspected visually by two readers to determine the MAVO phase. The annular area was measured at the MAVO phase and the typical systolic phase (35{\%} of the R-R interval). Differences in the annular area that would change valve sizing for prostheses were noted. Results Fifty patients (mean age 81) were studied. Ninety percent had the MAVO at the 15{\%}–25{\%} R-R interval. There was high interobserver correlation (0.89) for determining the MAVO phase by visual inspection. For 49 out of 50 patients, the annular area was maximal at the MAVO phase. The mean difference in the annular area between the MAVO phase and 35{\%} was 22.3 (±4.57) mm2. In 12{\%} of the patients, the difference in the annular area changed the recommended size of a self-expanding prosthesis and would have altered the procedure in 32{\%} for balloon-expandable prostheses. Conclusions Visually assessed MAVO occurs in early systole for most patients and is almost always the cardiac phase of the maximal aortic annular area. This method allows rapid and reproducible determination of the appropriate phase for TAVR planning measurements. Consideration should be given to optimizing pre-TAVR computed tomography acquisitions for early systolic reconstruction and visual determination of the MAVO.",
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N2 - Rationale and Objectives The optimal phase for the measurement of the aortic annular area for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is not standardized, although most agree that systolic measurements are preferred, when the annulus is larger. We hypothesized that the maximum annular area occurs at the cardiac phase of the maximum aortic valve opening (MAVO) and that this phase can be accurately and reproducibly assessed by visual inspection only. Materials and Methods The aortic valve opening area was inspected visually by two readers to determine the MAVO phase. The annular area was measured at the MAVO phase and the typical systolic phase (35% of the R-R interval). Differences in the annular area that would change valve sizing for prostheses were noted. Results Fifty patients (mean age 81) were studied. Ninety percent had the MAVO at the 15%–25% R-R interval. There was high interobserver correlation (0.89) for determining the MAVO phase by visual inspection. For 49 out of 50 patients, the annular area was maximal at the MAVO phase. The mean difference in the annular area between the MAVO phase and 35% was 22.3 (±4.57) mm2. In 12% of the patients, the difference in the annular area changed the recommended size of a self-expanding prosthesis and would have altered the procedure in 32% for balloon-expandable prostheses. Conclusions Visually assessed MAVO occurs in early systole for most patients and is almost always the cardiac phase of the maximal aortic annular area. This method allows rapid and reproducible determination of the appropriate phase for TAVR planning measurements. Consideration should be given to optimizing pre-TAVR computed tomography acquisitions for early systolic reconstruction and visual determination of the MAVO.

AB - Rationale and Objectives The optimal phase for the measurement of the aortic annular area for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is not standardized, although most agree that systolic measurements are preferred, when the annulus is larger. We hypothesized that the maximum annular area occurs at the cardiac phase of the maximum aortic valve opening (MAVO) and that this phase can be accurately and reproducibly assessed by visual inspection only. Materials and Methods The aortic valve opening area was inspected visually by two readers to determine the MAVO phase. The annular area was measured at the MAVO phase and the typical systolic phase (35% of the R-R interval). Differences in the annular area that would change valve sizing for prostheses were noted. Results Fifty patients (mean age 81) were studied. Ninety percent had the MAVO at the 15%–25% R-R interval. There was high interobserver correlation (0.89) for determining the MAVO phase by visual inspection. For 49 out of 50 patients, the annular area was maximal at the MAVO phase. The mean difference in the annular area between the MAVO phase and 35% was 22.3 (±4.57) mm2. In 12% of the patients, the difference in the annular area changed the recommended size of a self-expanding prosthesis and would have altered the procedure in 32% for balloon-expandable prostheses. Conclusions Visually assessed MAVO occurs in early systole for most patients and is almost always the cardiac phase of the maximal aortic annular area. This method allows rapid and reproducible determination of the appropriate phase for TAVR planning measurements. Consideration should be given to optimizing pre-TAVR computed tomography acquisitions for early systolic reconstruction and visual determination of the MAVO.

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