Maximizing acceptability and usefulness of an automated telephone intervention: Lessons from a developmental mixed-methods approach

Jennifer Schneider, Amy Waterbury, Adrianne Feldstein, Jerena Donovan, William M. Vollmer, Joan Dubanoski, Shelley Clark, Cynthia S Rand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective was to describe the utility of mixed methods to inform the development of an automated telephone intervention to improve patients' compliance with asthma medication. As part of intervention development for a larger trial, we conducted 15 focus groups (n = 53) to design and develop calls, and to identify factors influencing intervention acceptability and usefulness. We piloted four call types and interviewed 64 participants to further improve call content and receptivity to the intervention. Feedback led to several changes to the intervention scripts and eventual calls, and an initial pilot led us to drop one of the calls. During the pilot, we reached 43 percent of target participants; 74 percent of those stayed on the call until it ended. This process provided key insights about automated calls, and may have broader applicability for the development of automated interventions designed to help patients manage a variety of chronic conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-88
Number of pages17
JournalHealth Informatics Journal
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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Patient Compliance
Focus Groups
Telephone
Asthma

Keywords

  • automated telephone interventions
  • interactive voice recognition
  • intervention development
  • mixed methods
  • qualitative methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Maximizing acceptability and usefulness of an automated telephone intervention : Lessons from a developmental mixed-methods approach. / Schneider, Jennifer; Waterbury, Amy; Feldstein, Adrianne; Donovan, Jerena; Vollmer, William M.; Dubanoski, Joan; Clark, Shelley; Rand, Cynthia S.

In: Health Informatics Journal, Vol. 17, No. 1, 03.2011, p. 72-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schneider, Jennifer ; Waterbury, Amy ; Feldstein, Adrianne ; Donovan, Jerena ; Vollmer, William M. ; Dubanoski, Joan ; Clark, Shelley ; Rand, Cynthia S. / Maximizing acceptability and usefulness of an automated telephone intervention : Lessons from a developmental mixed-methods approach. In: Health Informatics Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 72-88.
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