Maximal heart rate prediction in adults that are overweight or obese

Shawn C. Franckowiak, Devon A. Dobrosielski, Suzanne M. Reilley, Jeremy D Walston, Ross E. Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An accurate predictor of maximal heart rate (MHR) is necessary to prescribe safe and effective exercise in those considered overweight and obese when actual measurement of MHR is unavailable or contraindicated. To date, accuracy of MHR prediction equations in individuals that are overweight or obese has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of 3 equations for predicting MHR in adults that are overweight or obese. One hundred seventythree sedentary adults that were overweight or obese enrolled in weight-loss study and performed a V̇O2peak treadmill test before the start of the weight loss treatment. A total of 132 of the 173 participants met conditions for achieving maximal exercise testing criteria and were included in this study. Maximal heart rate values determined from V̇O 2peak treadmill tests were compared across gender, age, and weight status with the following prediction equations: (a) 220 2 age, (b) 208 2 0.7 × age, and (c) 200 2 0.48 × age. Among 20-to 40-year-old participants, actual MHR averaged 180 ± 9 b·min2-1 and was overestimated (p <0.001) at 186 ± 5 b·min2-1 with the 220 2 age equation. Weight status did not affect predictive accuracy of any of the 3 equations. For all participants, the equation, 20020.48 × age estimated MHR to be 178 ± 4 b·min2-1, which was greater than the actual value (175 ± 12, p = 0.005). Prediction equations showed close agreement to actual MHR, with 208 2 0.7 × age being the most accurate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1407-1412
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Heart Rate
Exercise Test
Weight Loss
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Accuracy
  • Equations
  • Exercise prescription
  • Exercise testing
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Maximal heart rate prediction in adults that are overweight or obese. / Franckowiak, Shawn C.; Dobrosielski, Devon A.; Reilley, Suzanne M.; Walston, Jeremy D; Andersen, Ross E.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 25, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 1407-1412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Franckowiak, Shawn C. ; Dobrosielski, Devon A. ; Reilley, Suzanne M. ; Walston, Jeremy D ; Andersen, Ross E. / Maximal heart rate prediction in adults that are overweight or obese. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2011 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 1407-1412.
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