Maximal Exercise Testing Variables and 10-Year Survival

Fitness Risk Score Derivation from the FIT Project

Haitham M. Ahmed, Mouaz H. Al-Mallah, John W. McEvoy, Khurram Nasir, Roger S Blumenthal, Steven Jones, Clinton A. Brawner, Steven J. Keteyian, Michael Blaha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To determine which routinely collected exercise test variables most strongly correlate with survival and to derive a fitness risk score that can be used to predict 10-year survival. Patients and Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of 58,020 adults aged 18 to 96 years who were free of established heart disease and were referred for an exercise stress test from January 1, 1991, through May 31, 2009. Demographic, clinical, exercise, and mortality data were collected on all patients as part of the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify exercise test variables most predictive of survival. A "FIT Treadmill Score" was then derived from the β coefficients of the model with the highest survival discrimination. Results The median age of the 58,020 participants was 53 years (interquartile range, 45-62 years), and 28,201 (49%) were female. Over a median of 10 years (interquartile range, 8-14 years), 6456 patients (11%) died. After age and sex, peak metabolic equivalents of task and percentage of maximum predicted heart rate achieved were most highly predictive of survival (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-355
Number of pages10
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Exercise Test
Exercise
Survival
Metabolic Equivalent
Proportional Hazards Models
Heart Diseases
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Heart Rate
Demography
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Maximal Exercise Testing Variables and 10-Year Survival : Fitness Risk Score Derivation from the FIT Project. / Ahmed, Haitham M.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.; McEvoy, John W.; Nasir, Khurram; Blumenthal, Roger S; Jones, Steven; Brawner, Clinton A.; Keteyian, Steven J.; Blaha, Michael.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 90, No. 3, 01.03.2015, p. 346-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahmed, Haitham M. ; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H. ; McEvoy, John W. ; Nasir, Khurram ; Blumenthal, Roger S ; Jones, Steven ; Brawner, Clinton A. ; Keteyian, Steven J. ; Blaha, Michael. / Maximal Exercise Testing Variables and 10-Year Survival : Fitness Risk Score Derivation from the FIT Project. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2015 ; Vol. 90, No. 3. pp. 346-355.
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