Matrix metalloprotease-9 release from monocytes increases as a function of differentiation: Implications for neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration

Catharina M P Vos, Suzanne Gartner, Richard M. Ransohoff, Justin Charles McArthur, Larry Wahl, Lucas Sjulson, Edward Hunter, Katherine Conant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Naive monocytes extravasate in response to monocyte chemoattractant-1 (MCP-1) and subsequently, following differentiation within tissue, carry out effector functions. Consistent with this concept, expression of the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 decreases with monocyte differentiation, as production of cytokines increases (Fantuzzi et al., 1999). Because matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) may also play an important role in the ability of monocytes to migrate into tissues and/or to promote pathogen clearance/tissue injury, we have examined production of matrix metalloprotease-9 as a function of both monocyte differentiation in vitro and expression of CCR2. Increased time in culture, which is linked to monocyte differentiation, resulted in enhanced production of MMP-9, assessed by gelatin substrate zymography. Further, CCR2- negative monocytes produced greater quantities of MMP-9 than did naive CCR2- positive cells. Our results indicate that MMP-9 release increases during monocyte differentiation, consistent with a prominent role in effector functions. Because extracellular matrix proteins are important to cell structure and survival (Wee Yong et al., 1998), increased expression of MMP-9 could contribute to tissue damage following monocyte differentiation. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume109
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 22 2000

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Metalloproteases
Monocytes
CCR2 Receptors
Extracellular Matrix Proteins
Chemotactic Factors
Gelatin
Cell Survival
Cytokines
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • CCR-2
  • MCP-1
  • MMP-9
  • Monocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Matrix metalloprotease-9 release from monocytes increases as a function of differentiation : Implications for neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. / Vos, Catharina M P; Gartner, Suzanne; Ransohoff, Richard M.; McArthur, Justin Charles; Wahl, Larry; Sjulson, Lucas; Hunter, Edward; Conant, Katherine.

In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, Vol. 109, No. 2, 22.09.2000, p. 221-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vos, Catharina M P ; Gartner, Suzanne ; Ransohoff, Richard M. ; McArthur, Justin Charles ; Wahl, Larry ; Sjulson, Lucas ; Hunter, Edward ; Conant, Katherine. / Matrix metalloprotease-9 release from monocytes increases as a function of differentiation : Implications for neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In: Journal of Neuroimmunology. 2000 ; Vol. 109, No. 2. pp. 221-227.
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