Maternal Vitamin A supplementation and lung function in offspring

William Checkley, Keith West, Robert A Wise, Matthew R. Baldwin, Lee Shu Fune Wu, Steven C. Leclerq, Parul S Christian, Joanne Katz, James M. Tielsch, Subarna Khatry, Alfred Sommer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Vitamin A is important in regulating early lung development and alveolar formation. Maternal vitamin A status may be an important determinant of embryonic alveolar formation, and vitamin A deficiency in a mother during pregnancy could have lasting adverse effects on the lung health of her offspring. We tested this hypothesis by examining the long-term effects of supplementation with vitamin A or beta carotene in women before, during, and after pregnancy on the lung function of their offspring, in a population with chronic vitamin A deficiency. Methods: We examined a cohort of rural Nepali children 9 to 13 years of age whose mothers had participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, cluster-randomized trial of vitamin A or beta-carotene supplementation between 1994 and 1997. Results: Of 1894 children who were alive at the end of the original trial, 1658 (88%) were eligible to participate in the follow-up trial. We performed spirometry in 1371 of the children (83% of those eligible) between October 2006 and March 2008. Children whose mothers had received vitamin A had a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and a forced vital capacity (FVC) that were significantly higher than those of children whose mothers had received placebo (FEV1, 46 ml higher with vitamin A; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6 to 86; FVC, 46 ml higher with vitamin A; 95% CI, 8 to 84), after adjustment for height, age, sex, body-mass index, calendar month, caste, and individual spirometer used. Children whose mothers had received beta carotene had adjusted FEV1 and FVC values that were similar to those of children whose mothers had received placebo (FEV1, 14 ml higher with beta carotene; 95% CI, -24 to 54; FVC, 17 ml higher with beta carotene, 95% CI, -21 to 55). Conclusions: In a chronically undernourished population, maternal repletion with vitamin A at recommended dietary levels before, during, and after pregnancy improved lung function in offspring. This public health benefit was apparent in the preadolescent years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1784-1794
Number of pages11
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume362
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - May 13 2010

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Vitamin A
Mothers
beta Carotene
Lung
Vital Capacity
Forced Expiratory Volume
Confidence Intervals
Vitamin A Deficiency
Placebos
Pregnancy
Spirometry
Insurance Benefits
Social Class
Population
Body Mass Index
Public Health
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Maternal Vitamin A supplementation and lung function in offspring. / Checkley, William; West, Keith; Wise, Robert A; Baldwin, Matthew R.; Wu, Lee Shu Fune; Leclerq, Steven C.; Christian, Parul S; Katz, Joanne; Tielsch, James M.; Khatry, Subarna; Sommer, Alfred.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 362, No. 19, 13.05.2010, p. 1784-1794.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Vitamin A is important in regulating early lung development and alveolar formation. Maternal vitamin A status may be an important determinant of embryonic alveolar formation, and vitamin A deficiency in a mother during pregnancy could have lasting adverse effects on the lung health of her offspring. We tested this hypothesis by examining the long-term effects of supplementation with vitamin A or beta carotene in women before, during, and after pregnancy on the lung function of their offspring, in a population with chronic vitamin A deficiency. Methods: We examined a cohort of rural Nepali children 9 to 13 years of age whose mothers had participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, cluster-randomized trial of vitamin A or beta-carotene supplementation between 1994 and 1997. Results: Of 1894 children who were alive at the end of the original trial, 1658 (88{\%}) were eligible to participate in the follow-up trial. We performed spirometry in 1371 of the children (83{\%} of those eligible) between October 2006 and March 2008. Children whose mothers had received vitamin A had a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and a forced vital capacity (FVC) that were significantly higher than those of children whose mothers had received placebo (FEV1, 46 ml higher with vitamin A; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 6 to 86; FVC, 46 ml higher with vitamin A; 95{\%} CI, 8 to 84), after adjustment for height, age, sex, body-mass index, calendar month, caste, and individual spirometer used. Children whose mothers had received beta carotene had adjusted FEV1 and FVC values that were similar to those of children whose mothers had received placebo (FEV1, 14 ml higher with beta carotene; 95{\%} CI, -24 to 54; FVC, 17 ml higher with beta carotene, 95{\%} CI, -21 to 55). Conclusions: In a chronically undernourished population, maternal repletion with vitamin A at recommended dietary levels before, during, and after pregnancy improved lung function in offspring. This public health benefit was apparent in the preadolescent years.",
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AU - Checkley, William

AU - West, Keith

AU - Wise, Robert A

AU - Baldwin, Matthew R.

AU - Wu, Lee Shu Fune

AU - Leclerq, Steven C.

AU - Christian, Parul S

AU - Katz, Joanne

AU - Tielsch, James M.

AU - Khatry, Subarna

AU - Sommer, Alfred

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