Maternal serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor levels and spontaneous preterm birth

Brian W. Whitcomb, Enrique F. Schisterman, Xiaoping Luo, Nasser Chegini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Preterm birth (PTB) remains a cause of substantial morbidity with an elusive etiology. Previous studies suggested an association of PTB with elevated serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) at 28 weeks gestation. G-CSF, a hematopoietic cytokine, mediates the increase in leukocytes in pregnancy and may play a role in placentation. We evaluated the association between maternal serum G-CSF in the first and second trimesters and PTB. Methods: Serum samples collected for the Collaborative Perinatal Project (CPP) from women with normal pregnancy (n = 394) and PTB (n = 31), defined as delivery before 37 weeks gestation, were used to assess G-CSF levels. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relation of G-CSF with gestational age (GA) at birth. Logistic regression, conditional on GA at sample provision, was used to model the association between G-CSF and PTB. Results: G-CSF was significantly associated with gestational age at birth (p = 0.02). In conditional logistic regression models, G-CSF was significantly associated with PTB, with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 1.52 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07, 2.16) per standard deviation (SD) increase. Conclusions: Acute effects of G-CSF on PTB have been suggested. In our study we observed an association of higher serum G-CSF levels early in the second trimester with PTB, suggesting PTB as the culmination process beginning early in, if not before, pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-78
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Premature Birth
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Mothers
Serum
Pregnancy
Gestational Age
Logistic Models
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Parturition
Placentation
First Pregnancy Trimester
Linear Models
Leukocytes
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Cytokines
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Maternal serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor levels and spontaneous preterm birth. / Whitcomb, Brian W.; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Luo, Xiaoping; Chegini, Nasser.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 73-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whitcomb, Brian W. ; Schisterman, Enrique F. ; Luo, Xiaoping ; Chegini, Nasser. / Maternal serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor levels and spontaneous preterm birth. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 73-78.
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