Maternal reasons for non-immunisation and partial immunisation in northern Nigeria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To compare maternal reasons for non-immunisation and for partial immunisation in northern Nigeria, and determine the link between specific reasons and future intentions to immunise. Methods: Responses to open-ended questions collected through a 2007 questionnaire survey were individually coded for key words using the regexm command in Stata (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). Simple percentages are used to analyse the differences in reasons for non-immunisation and partial immunisation. Logistic regression serves to assess the relationship between specific reasons for non-immunisation and future intentions to immunise. Results: The reasons for non-immunisation generally differ from those advanced for partial immunisation. In general, reasons for non-immunisation have to do with ideational and normative factors. In contrast, supply-side factors are the reasons most often advanced for partial immunisation, although lack of knowledge also plays a strong role. Some reasons for non-immunisation are more compatible with future intention to immunise than others. Conclusions: Efforts to promote the uptake of immunisation need to address both demand- and supply-side factors. Increasing knowledge about immunisation, changing negative attitudes about immunisation, debunking myths and rumours about immunisation, and addressing religious, ethnic and political bases for resistance to immunisation are necessary to encourage parents to initiate child immunisation. To promote timely completion of immunisation schedule, programmes will need to improve vaccine supply, strengthen provider's capacity for quality service and increase community knowledge about immunisation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-281
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Nigeria
Immunization
Mothers
Immunization Schedule
Immunization Programs
Vaccines
Parents
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • childhood
  • immunisation
  • mothers
  • Nigeria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Maternal reasons for non-immunisation and partial immunisation in northern Nigeria. / Babalola, Stella.

In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol. 47, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 276-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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