Maternal influenza vaccination and effect on influenza virus infection in young infants

Angelia A. Eick, Timothy M. Uyeki, Alexander Klimov, Henrietta Hall, Raymond Reid, Mathuram Santosham, Katherine L O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To assess the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination during pregnancy on laboratory-confirmed influenza in infants to 6 months of age. Design: Nonrandomized, prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Navajo and White Mountain Apache Indian reservations, including 6 hospitals on the Navajo reservation and 1 on the White Mountain Apache reservation. Participants: A total of 1169 mother-infant pairs with mothers who delivered an infant during 1 of 3 influenza seasons. Main Exposure: Maternal seasonal influenza vaccination. Main Outcome Measures: In infants, laboratory-confirmed influenza, influenzalike illness (ILI), ILI hospitalization, and influenza hemagglutinin inhibition antibody titers. Results: A total of 1160 mother-infant pairs had serum collected and were included in the analysis. Among infants, 193 (17%) had an ILI hospitalization, 412 (36%) had only an ILI outpatient visit, and 555 (48%) had no ILI episodes. The ILI incidence rate was 7.2 and 6.7 per 1000 person-days for infants born to unvaccinated and vaccinated women, respectively. There was a 41% reduction in the risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza virus infection (relative risk, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.93) and a 39% reduction in the risk of ILI hospitalization (relative risk, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.84) for infants born to influenza-vaccinated women compared with infants born to unvaccinated mothers. Infants born to influenza-vaccinated women had significantly higher hemagglutinin inhibition antibody titers at birth and at 2 to 3 months of age than infants of unvaccinated mothers for all 8 influenza virus strains investigated. Conclusions: Maternal influenza vaccination was significantly associated with reduced risk of influenza virus infection and hospitalization for an ILI up to 6 months of age and increased influenza antibody titers in infants through 2 to 3 months of age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-111
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume165
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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