Maternal influenza vaccination and effect on influenza virus infection in young infants

Angelia A. Eick, Timothy M. Uyeki, Alexander Klimov, Henrietta Hall, Raymond Reid, Mathuram Santosham, Katherine L. O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess the effect of seasonal influenza vaccination during pregnancy on laboratory-confirmed influenza in infants to 6 months of age. Design: Nonrandomized, prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Navajo and White Mountain Apache Indian reservations, including 6 hospitals on the Navajo reservation and 1 on the White Mountain Apache reservation. Participants: A total of 1169 mother-infant pairs with mothers who delivered an infant during 1 of 3 influenza seasons. Main Exposure: Maternal seasonal influenza vaccination. Main Outcome Measures: In infants, laboratory-confirmed influenza, influenzalike illness (ILI), ILI hospitalization, and influenza hemagglutinin inhibition antibody titers. Results: A total of 1160 mother-infant pairs had serum collected and were included in the analysis. Among infants, 193 (17%) had an ILI hospitalization, 412 (36%) had only an ILI outpatient visit, and 555 (48%) had no ILI episodes. The ILI incidence rate was 7.2 and 6.7 per 1000 person-days for infants born to unvaccinated and vaccinated women, respectively. There was a 41% reduction in the risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza virus infection (relative risk, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.93) and a 39% reduction in the risk of ILI hospitalization (relative risk, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.84) for infants born to influenza-vaccinated women compared with infants born to unvaccinated mothers. Infants born to influenza-vaccinated women had significantly higher hemagglutinin inhibition antibody titers at birth and at 2 to 3 months of age than infants of unvaccinated mothers for all 8 influenza virus strains investigated. Conclusions: Maternal influenza vaccination was significantly associated with reduced risk of influenza virus infection and hospitalization for an ILI up to 6 months of age and increased influenza antibody titers in infants through 2 to 3 months of age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-111
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume165
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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