Maternal infection leads to abnormal gene regulation and brain atrophy in mouse offspring: Implications for genesis of neurodevelopmental disorders

S. Hossein Fatemi, Teri J. Reutiman, Timothy D. Folsom, Hao Huang, Kenichi Oishi, Susumu Mori, Donald F. Smee, David A. Pearce, Christine Winter, Reinhard Sohr, Georg Juckel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Prenatal viral infection has been associated with development of schizophrenia and autism. Our laboratory has previously shown that viral infection causes deleterious effects on brain structure and function in mouse offspring following late first trimester (E9) administration of influenza virus. We hypothesized that late second trimester infection (E18) in mice may lead to a different pattern of brain gene expression and structural defects in the developing offspring. C57BL6J mice were infected on E18 with a sublethal dose of human influenza virus or sham-infected using vehicle solution. Male offsping of the infected mice were collected at P0, P14, P35 and P56, their brains removed and prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum dissected and flash frozen. Microarray, qRT-PCR, DTI and MRI scanning, western blotting and neurochemical analysis were performed to detect differences in gene expression and brain atrophy. Expression of several genes associated with schizophrenia or autism including Sema3a, Trfr2 and Vldlr were found to be altered as were protein levels of Foxp2. E18 infection of C57BL6J mice with a sublethal dose of human influenza virus led to significant gene alterations in frontal, hippocampal and cerebellar cortices of developing mouse progeny. Brain imaging revealed significant atrophy in several brain areas and white matter thinning in corpus callosum. Finally, neurochemical analysis revealed significantly altered levels of serotonin (P14, P35), 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (P14) and taurine (P35). We propose that maternal infection in mouse provides an heuristic animal model for studying the environmental contributions to genesis of schizophrenia and autism, two important examples of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-70
Number of pages15
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume99
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Fingerprint

Atrophy
Mothers
Brain
Infection
Genes
Autistic Disorder
Orthomyxoviridae
Schizophrenia
Virus Diseases
Gene Expression
Human Influenza
Semaphorin-3A
Cerebellar Cortex
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
Corpus Callosum
Taurine
Second Pregnancy Trimester
Frontal Lobe
First Pregnancy Trimester
Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Brain
  • DNA microarray
  • Mouse
  • Schizophrenia
  • Viral model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Maternal infection leads to abnormal gene regulation and brain atrophy in mouse offspring : Implications for genesis of neurodevelopmental disorders. / Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Huang, Hao; Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Smee, Donald F.; Pearce, David A.; Winter, Christine; Sohr, Reinhard; Juckel, Georg.

In: Schizophrenia Research, Vol. 99, No. 1-3, 02.2008, p. 56-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fatemi, S. Hossein ; Reutiman, Teri J. ; Folsom, Timothy D. ; Huang, Hao ; Oishi, Kenichi ; Mori, Susumu ; Smee, Donald F. ; Pearce, David A. ; Winter, Christine ; Sohr, Reinhard ; Juckel, Georg. / Maternal infection leads to abnormal gene regulation and brain atrophy in mouse offspring : Implications for genesis of neurodevelopmental disorders. In: Schizophrenia Research. 2008 ; Vol. 99, No. 1-3. pp. 56-70.
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