Depresión materna y crecimiento durante la primera infancia en los países en vías de desarrollo

Revisión sistemática y metaanálisis

Translated title of the contribution: Maternal depression and early childhood growth in developing countries: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To investigate the relationship between maternal depression and child growth in developing countries through a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Methods Six databases were searched for studies from developing countries on maternal depression and child growth published up until 2010. Standard meta-analytical methods were followed and pooled odds ratios (ORs) for underweight and stunting in the children of depressed mothers were calculated using random effects models for all studies and for subsets of studies that met strict criteria on study design, exposure to maternal depression and outcome variables. The population attributable risk (PAR) was estimated for selected studies. Findings Seventeen studies including a total of 13 923 mother and child pairs from 11 countries met inclusion criteria. The children of mothers with depression or depressive symptoms were more likely to be underweight (OR: 1.5; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2-1.8) or stunted (OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.7). Subanalysis of three longitudinal studies showed a stronger effect: the OR for underweight was 2.2 (95% CI: 1.5-3.2) and for stunting, 2.0 (95% CI: 1.0-3.9). The PAR for selected studies indicated that if the infant population were entirely unexposed to maternal depressive symptoms 23% to 29% fewer children would be underweight or stunted. Conclusion Maternal depression was associated with early childhood underweight and stunting. Rigorous prospective studies are needed to identify mechanisms and causes. Early identification, treatment and prevention of maternal depression may help reduce child stunting and underweight in developing countries.

Original languageArabic
Pages (from-to)607-615
Number of pages9
JournalBulletin of the World Health Organization
Volume89
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Fingerprint

Developing Countries
Meta-Analysis
Thinness
Mothers
Growth Disorders
Depression
Growth
Odds Ratio
Population
Maternal Exposure
Longitudinal Studies
Databases
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{24808640bcc74b9ca1d3a3a1b0846428,
title = "Depresi{\'o}n materna y crecimiento durante la primera infancia en los pa{\'i}ses en v{\'i}as de desarrollo: Revisi{\'o}n sistem{\'a}tica y metaan{\'a}lisis",
abstract = "Objective To investigate the relationship between maternal depression and child growth in developing countries through a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Methods Six databases were searched for studies from developing countries on maternal depression and child growth published up until 2010. Standard meta-analytical methods were followed and pooled odds ratios (ORs) for underweight and stunting in the children of depressed mothers were calculated using random effects models for all studies and for subsets of studies that met strict criteria on study design, exposure to maternal depression and outcome variables. The population attributable risk (PAR) was estimated for selected studies. Findings Seventeen studies including a total of 13 923 mother and child pairs from 11 countries met inclusion criteria. The children of mothers with depression or depressive symptoms were more likely to be underweight (OR: 1.5; 95{\%} confidence interval, CI: 1.2-1.8) or stunted (OR: 1.4; 95{\%} CI: 1.2-1.7). Subanalysis of three longitudinal studies showed a stronger effect: the OR for underweight was 2.2 (95{\%} CI: 1.5-3.2) and for stunting, 2.0 (95{\%} CI: 1.0-3.9). The PAR for selected studies indicated that if the infant population were entirely unexposed to maternal depressive symptoms 23{\%} to 29{\%} fewer children would be underweight or stunted. Conclusion Maternal depression was associated with early childhood underweight and stunting. Rigorous prospective studies are needed to identify mechanisms and causes. Early identification, treatment and prevention of maternal depression may help reduce child stunting and underweight in developing countries.",
author = "Pamela Surkan and Kennedy, {Caitlin E} and Hurley, {Kristen Marie} and Black, {Maureen M.}",
year = "2011",
month = "8",
doi = "10.2471/BLT.11.088187",
language = "Arabic",
volume = "89",
pages = "607--615",
journal = "Bulletin of the World Health Organization",
issn = "0042-9686",
publisher = "World Health Organization",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Depresión materna y crecimiento durante la primera infancia en los países en vías de desarrollo

T2 - Revisión sistemática y metaanálisis

AU - Surkan, Pamela

AU - Kennedy, Caitlin E

AU - Hurley, Kristen Marie

AU - Black, Maureen M.

PY - 2011/8

Y1 - 2011/8

N2 - Objective To investigate the relationship between maternal depression and child growth in developing countries through a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Methods Six databases were searched for studies from developing countries on maternal depression and child growth published up until 2010. Standard meta-analytical methods were followed and pooled odds ratios (ORs) for underweight and stunting in the children of depressed mothers were calculated using random effects models for all studies and for subsets of studies that met strict criteria on study design, exposure to maternal depression and outcome variables. The population attributable risk (PAR) was estimated for selected studies. Findings Seventeen studies including a total of 13 923 mother and child pairs from 11 countries met inclusion criteria. The children of mothers with depression or depressive symptoms were more likely to be underweight (OR: 1.5; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2-1.8) or stunted (OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.7). Subanalysis of three longitudinal studies showed a stronger effect: the OR for underweight was 2.2 (95% CI: 1.5-3.2) and for stunting, 2.0 (95% CI: 1.0-3.9). The PAR for selected studies indicated that if the infant population were entirely unexposed to maternal depressive symptoms 23% to 29% fewer children would be underweight or stunted. Conclusion Maternal depression was associated with early childhood underweight and stunting. Rigorous prospective studies are needed to identify mechanisms and causes. Early identification, treatment and prevention of maternal depression may help reduce child stunting and underweight in developing countries.

AB - Objective To investigate the relationship between maternal depression and child growth in developing countries through a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Methods Six databases were searched for studies from developing countries on maternal depression and child growth published up until 2010. Standard meta-analytical methods were followed and pooled odds ratios (ORs) for underweight and stunting in the children of depressed mothers were calculated using random effects models for all studies and for subsets of studies that met strict criteria on study design, exposure to maternal depression and outcome variables. The population attributable risk (PAR) was estimated for selected studies. Findings Seventeen studies including a total of 13 923 mother and child pairs from 11 countries met inclusion criteria. The children of mothers with depression or depressive symptoms were more likely to be underweight (OR: 1.5; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2-1.8) or stunted (OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.7). Subanalysis of three longitudinal studies showed a stronger effect: the OR for underweight was 2.2 (95% CI: 1.5-3.2) and for stunting, 2.0 (95% CI: 1.0-3.9). The PAR for selected studies indicated that if the infant population were entirely unexposed to maternal depressive symptoms 23% to 29% fewer children would be underweight or stunted. Conclusion Maternal depression was associated with early childhood underweight and stunting. Rigorous prospective studies are needed to identify mechanisms and causes. Early identification, treatment and prevention of maternal depression may help reduce child stunting and underweight in developing countries.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79960990678&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79960990678&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2471/BLT.11.088187

DO - 10.2471/BLT.11.088187

M3 - Article

VL - 89

SP - 607

EP - 615

JO - Bulletin of the World Health Organization

JF - Bulletin of the World Health Organization

SN - 0042-9686

IS - 8

ER -