Material-specific memory in traumatic brain injury: Differential effects during acquisition, recall, and retention

Rodney D. Vanderploeg, Glenn Curtiss, John A. Schinka, Richard A. Lanham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Material-specific memory refers to the ability to learn and recall new episodic information on the basis of the nature of the stimulus material (e.g., verbal vs. nonverbal-visuospatial). Structural equation modeling was used to analyze data from a sample of patients with traumatic brain injury to compare 3 models of memory functioning: material-specific, material-specific plus general, and general (non-material-specific). The models were examined separately for acquisition, delayed free recall, and retention aspects of memory. Results suggest that, at least in a population with traumatic brain injury, the acquisition of new information takes place in a material-specific memory fashion, delayed free recall involves both material-specific and general (non-material-specific) memory components, but retention relies primarily on general (non-material-specific) memory processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-184
Number of pages11
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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