Mastitis and Immunological Factors in Breast Milk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women

Richard D. Semba, Newton Kumwenda, Taha E. Taha, Donald R. Hoover, Thomas C. Quinn, Yin Lan, Laban Mtimavalye, Robin Broadhead, Paolo G. Miotti, Len Van Der Hoeven, John D. Chiphangwi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Human milk contains important immunological factors that protect the breast from infection and are thought to protect infants from infection, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Human milk immunological factors have not been well characterized in HIV-infected lactating women. Lysozyme, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), sodium (an indicator of mastitis), and HIV were measured in breast milk of 334 HIV-infected women at 6 weeks postpartum. Women with mastitis, as indicated by elevated breast milk sodium concentrations, had higher median levels lysozyme (290 vs 221 mg/L,p<0.04), SLPI (38 vs 19 mg/L,p<0.0001) and HIV (920 copies/mL vs undetectable,p<0.0001) compared with women without mastitis. Lower total plasma carotenoid levels (p<0.02) and higher maternal HIV load (p<0.006) by quartile were risk factors for mastitis. Mastitis, as indicated by elevated breast milk sodium levels, is associated with high concentrations of immunological factors and higher HIV load in breast milk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-306
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1999

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Lysozyme
  • Mastitis
  • Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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