Mastery, burden, and areas of concern among family caregivers of mentally ill persons

Linda E. Rose, R. Kevin Mallinson, Linda D. Gerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In an era of limited resources for mental health care, family interventions need to target areas where they are responsive to families' expressed needs. Although family burden has been documented, less is known about the areas of concern that families feel they need direct assistance with, to be effective caregivers. Telephone interviews were conducted with 30 family members of mentally ill relatives. Burden, sense of mastery, and contexts of caregiving were assessed. Open-ended questions elicited further understandings of caregiving concerns. The most frequently identified burden was "worry about the future." The greatest concern was "dealing with sadness and grief." Recommendations for assessing family concerns are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-51
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Psychiatric Nursing
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mentally Ill Persons
Caregivers
Grief
Mental Health
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

Mastery, burden, and areas of concern among family caregivers of mentally ill persons. / Rose, Linda E.; Mallinson, R. Kevin; Gerson, Linda D.

In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 20, No. 1, 02.2006, p. 41-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rose, Linda E. ; Mallinson, R. Kevin ; Gerson, Linda D. / Mastery, burden, and areas of concern among family caregivers of mentally ill persons. In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing. 2006 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 41-51.
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