Markers of inflammation in children with severe malarial anaemia

Godfrey Biemba, Victor R. Gordeuk, Philip E Thuma, Günter Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To investigate if severe malarial anaemia is associated with a specific immune response pattern, we determined serum levels of neopterin (a marker of activation of macrophages by interferon-γ) and of the anti- inflammatory cytokines, interleukins 4 and 10. METHODS. Zambian children < 6 years of age presenting to a rural hospital with cerebral malaria were studied. Twenty-one children with admission haemoglobin concentrations ≤ 5 g/dl were classified as having severe anaemia and 40 with haemoglobin concentrations ≥ 7 g/dl served as a control group. RESULTS. Logistic regression modelling indicated that a 10-fold rise in serum neopterin concentrations was associated with a 50-fold increase in the estimated odds of having severe anaemia (P = 0.015), while a 10-fold rise in serum interleukin 4 concentrations was associated with a 10-fold decrease in the estimated odds of having severe anaemia (P = 0.023). Increasing serum interleukin 10 concentrations, measured in less than half of the subjects, were associated with a nonsignificant reduction in the odds of having severe anaemia (P = 0.095). CONCLUSION. Development of severe malarial anaemia may be directly associated with serum neopterin concentrations and inversely correlated with serum interleukin 4 levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-262
Number of pages7
JournalTropical Medicine and International Health
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anemia
Inflammation
Neopterin
Serum
Interleukin-4
Interleukin-10
Hemoglobins
Cerebral Malaria
Rural Hospitals
Macrophage Activation
Interferons
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Logistic Models
Cytokines
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Anaemia
  • Interleukin 10
  • Interleukin 4
  • Malaria
  • Neopterin
  • Zambia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Markers of inflammation in children with severe malarial anaemia. / Biemba, Godfrey; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Thuma, Philip E; Weiss, Günter.

In: Tropical Medicine and International Health, Vol. 5, No. 4, 2000, p. 256-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Biemba, Godfrey ; Gordeuk, Victor R. ; Thuma, Philip E ; Weiss, Günter. / Markers of inflammation in children with severe malarial anaemia. In: Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2000 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 256-262.
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