Mannose binding lectin genotypes influence recovery from hepatitis B virus infection

Chloe L Thio, Timothy Mosbruger, Jacquie Astemborski, Spencer Greer, Gregory D Kirk, Stephen J. O'Brien, David L Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mannose binding lectin (MBL) is a central component of the innate immune response and thus may be important for determining hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence. Since single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene encoding MBL (mbl2) alter the level of functional MBL, we hypothesized that mbl2 genotypes are a determinant of HBV persistence or recovery from viral infection. We tested this hypothesis by using a nested case control design with 189 persons with HBV persistence matched to 338 individuals who had naturally recovered from HBV infection. We determined genotypes of two promoter and three exon 1 SNPs in mbl2 and grouped these genotypes according to the amount of functional MBL production. We found that the promoter SNP -221C, which leads to deficient MBL production, was more common in those subjects with viral persistence (odds ratio [OR], 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.89; P = 0.04). Those subjects homozygous for the combination of promoter and exon 1 genotypes associated with the highest amount of functional MBL had significantly increased odds of recovery from infection (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.84; P = 0.005). Conversely, those homozygous for the combination of promoter and exon 1 genotypes which produce the lowest amount of functional MBL were more likely to have viral persistence (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.02 to 3.01; P = 0.04). These data are consistent with the hypothesis that functional MBL plays a central role in the pathogenesis of acute hepatitis B.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9192-9196
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume79
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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Mannose-Binding Lectin
Hepatitis B virus
Virus Diseases
mannose
lectins
Genotype
genotype
infection
promoter regions
odds ratio
single nucleotide polymorphism
exons
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
confidence interval
Exons
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
hepatitis B
Hepatitis B
Innate Immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Mannose binding lectin genotypes influence recovery from hepatitis B virus infection. / Thio, Chloe L; Mosbruger, Timothy; Astemborski, Jacquie; Greer, Spencer; Kirk, Gregory D; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Thomas, David L.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 79, No. 14, 07.2005, p. 9192-9196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thio, Chloe L ; Mosbruger, Timothy ; Astemborski, Jacquie ; Greer, Spencer ; Kirk, Gregory D ; O'Brien, Stephen J. ; Thomas, David L. / Mannose binding lectin genotypes influence recovery from hepatitis B virus infection. In: Journal of Virology. 2005 ; Vol. 79, No. 14. pp. 9192-9196.
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