Managing the monitors: An analysis of alarm silencing activities during an anesthetic procedure

Yan Xiao, Colin F. Mackenzie, F. Jacob Seagull, Mahmood Jaberi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Patient monitoring devices are designed to assist users in obtaining information on the patient and life-support equipment status. Most of the these devices have built-in visual and auditory alarms, which are to help the user to manage attention allocation. In this presentation we describe an analysis of the interaction between care providers and the monitoring devices during an anesthetic procedure (airway management) for trauma patients in the real environment The videotapes of 47 cases were analyzed by coding the activities in silencing auditory alarms. In majority of the cases (87%) alarms could be heard yet only a small portion of the cases (6%) contained patient status events that signified by the alarm conditions. Care providers were frequently forced to interrupt clinical tasks to silence alarms. The differences in silencing frequency and rapidity among different monitoring devices suggest that alarms could be designed to be less intrusive and more tolerable, thus making the monitors easier to manage in critical care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium'
Pages250-253
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium' - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jul 29 2000Aug 4 2000

Other

OtherProceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium'
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period7/29/008/4/00

Fingerprint

Anesthetics
pharmaceutical
monitoring
Patient monitoring
Monitoring
trauma
coding
event
interaction
management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Xiao, Y., Mackenzie, C. F., Seagull, F. J., & Jaberi, M. (2000). Managing the monitors: An analysis of alarm silencing activities during an anesthetic procedure. In Proceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium' (pp. 250-253)

Managing the monitors : An analysis of alarm silencing activities during an anesthetic procedure. / Xiao, Yan; Mackenzie, Colin F.; Seagull, F. Jacob; Jaberi, Mahmood.

Proceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium'. 2000. p. 250-253.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Xiao, Y, Mackenzie, CF, Seagull, FJ & Jaberi, M 2000, Managing the monitors: An analysis of alarm silencing activities during an anesthetic procedure. in Proceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium'. pp. 250-253, Proceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennnium', San Diego, CA, United States, 7/29/00.
Xiao Y, Mackenzie CF, Seagull FJ, Jaberi M. Managing the monitors: An analysis of alarm silencing activities during an anesthetic procedure. In Proceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium'. 2000. p. 250-253
Xiao, Yan ; Mackenzie, Colin F. ; Seagull, F. Jacob ; Jaberi, Mahmood. / Managing the monitors : An analysis of alarm silencing activities during an anesthetic procedure. Proceedings of the XIVth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association and 44th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Association, 'Ergonomics for the New Millennium'. 2000. pp. 250-253
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