Management of infections associated with neurocritical care

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The reported incidence of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) in the neurointensive care unit (NICU) ranges from 20% to 30%. HAIs in US hospitals cost between $28 and $45 billion per year in direct medical costs. These infections are associated with increased length of hospital stay and increased morbidity and mortality. Infection risk is increased in NICU patients due to medication side-effects, catheter and line placement, neurosurgical procedures, and acquired immune suppression secondary to steroid/barbiturate use and brain injury itself. Some of these infections may be preventable but many are not. Their appearance do not always constitute a failure of prevention or physician error. Neurointensivists require indepth knowledge of common nosocomial infections, their diagnosis and treatment, and an approach to evidence-based practices that improve processes of care and reduce HAIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-378
Number of pages14
JournalHandbook of Clinical Neurology
Volume140
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Cross Infection
Infection
Length of Stay
Neurosurgical Procedures
Hospital Costs
Evidence-Based Practice
Brain Injuries
Patient Care
Catheters
Steroids
Morbidity
Physicians
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • critical care management
  • ICU infections
  • neurosurgical care
  • nosocomial infections
  • postoperative infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Management of infections associated with neurocritical care. / Rivera Lara, Lucia; Ziai, Wendy C; Nyquist, Paul A.

In: Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Vol. 140, 2017, p. 365-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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