Male perpetration of teen dating violence: Associations with neighborhood violence involvement, gender attitudes, and perceived peer and neighborhood norms

Elizabeth Reed, Jay G. Silverman, Anita Raj, Michele R Decker, Elizabeth Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study aims to examine the link between male perpetration of teen dating violence (TDV) and neighborhood violence, as well as associations with gender attitudes and perceived peer and neighborhood norms related to violence among a sample of urban adolescent boys. Participants of this cross-sectional study (N=275) were between the ages of 14 and 20 years and recruited from urban community health centers. Crude and adjusted logistic and linear regression models were used to examine TDV perpetration in relation to (a) neighborhood violence involvement, (b) perceptions of peer violence, (c) perceptions of neighborhood violence, and (d) gender attitudes. Slightly more than one in four (28%) boys reported at least one form of TDV perpetration; among boys who have ever had sex, almost half (45%) reported at least one form of TDV perpetration. In logistic and linear regression models adjusted for demographics, boys who reported TDV perpetration were more likely to report involvement in neighborhood violence (odds ratio (OR)=3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.7-5.5), beliefs that their friends have perpetrated TDV (OR=2.7; 95%CI=1.4-5.1), perceptions of violent activity within their neighborhood (OR=3.0; 95%CI=1.4-6.3), and greater support of traditional gender norms (β=3.2, p=0.002). The findings suggest that efforts are needed to address boys' behaviors related to the perpetration of multiple forms of violence and require explicit efforts to reduce perceived norms of violence perpetration as well as problematic gender attitudes (e.g., increasing support for gender equity) across boys' life contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-239
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume88
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Violence
violence
gender
Linear Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Logistic Models
Urban Health
Community Health Centers
confidence
Intimate Partner Violence
logistics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
regression
cross-sectional study
equity

Keywords

  • Environmental factors
  • Gender norms
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Neighborhood
  • Teen dating violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Male perpetration of teen dating violence : Associations with neighborhood violence involvement, gender attitudes, and perceived peer and neighborhood norms. / Reed, Elizabeth; Silverman, Jay G.; Raj, Anita; Decker, Michele R; Miller, Elizabeth.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 88, No. 2, 04.2011, p. 226-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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