Male circumcision and mycoplasma genitalium infection in female partners: A randomised trial in rakai, uganda

Aaron A Tobian, Charlotte A Gaydos, Ronald H Gray, Godfrey Kigozi, David Serwadda, Nicole Quinn, Mary Grabowski, Richard Musoke, Anthony Ndyanabo, Fred Nalugoda, Maria J Wawer, Thomas C Quinn

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Abstract

Objective: Previous randomised trial data have demonstrated that male circumcision reduces Mycoplasma genitalium prevalence in men. We assessed whether male circumcision also reduces M genitalium infection in female partners of circumcised men. Methods: HIV-negative men were enrolled and randomised to either male circumcision or control. Female partners of male trial participants from the intervention (n=437) and control (n=394) arms provided interview information and self-collected vaginal swabs that were tested for M genitalium by APTIMA transcription-mediated amplification-based assay. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) and 95% CI of M genitalium prevalence in intervention versus control group were estimated using Poisson regression. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. An as-treated analysis was conducted to account for study-group crossovers. Results: Male and female partner enrolment sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviours, and symptoms of sexually transmitted infections were similar between study arms. Female M genitalium prevalence at year 2 was 3.2% (14/437) in the intervention arm and 3.6% (14/394) in the control arm (PRR=0.90, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.89, p=0.78). In an as-treated analysis, the prevalence of M genitalium was 3.4% in female partners of circumcised men and 3.3% in female partners of uncircumcised men (PRR=1.01, 95% CI 0.48to 2.12, p=0.97). Conclusions: Contrary to findings in men, male circumcision did not affect M genitalium infection in female partners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-154
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Infections
Volume90
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Mycoplasma genitalium
Mycoplasma Infections
Male Circumcision
Uganda
Odds Ratio
Intention to Treat Analysis
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Infection
Sexual Behavior
Cross-Over Studies
HIV
Interviews
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

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Male circumcision and mycoplasma genitalium infection in female partners : A randomised trial in rakai, uganda. / Tobian, Aaron A; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Gray, Ronald H; Kigozi, Godfrey; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Nicole; Grabowski, Mary; Musoke, Richard; Ndyanabo, Anthony; Nalugoda, Fred; Wawer, Maria J; Quinn, Thomas C.

In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, Vol. 90, No. 2, 2014, p. 150-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Male circumcision and mycoplasma genitalium infection in female partners: A randomised trial in rakai, uganda",
abstract = "Objective: Previous randomised trial data have demonstrated that male circumcision reduces Mycoplasma genitalium prevalence in men. We assessed whether male circumcision also reduces M genitalium infection in female partners of circumcised men. Methods: HIV-negative men were enrolled and randomised to either male circumcision or control. Female partners of male trial participants from the intervention (n=437) and control (n=394) arms provided interview information and self-collected vaginal swabs that were tested for M genitalium by APTIMA transcription-mediated amplification-based assay. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) and 95{\%} CI of M genitalium prevalence in intervention versus control group were estimated using Poisson regression. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. An as-treated analysis was conducted to account for study-group crossovers. Results: Male and female partner enrolment sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviours, and symptoms of sexually transmitted infections were similar between study arms. Female M genitalium prevalence at year 2 was 3.2{\%} (14/437) in the intervention arm and 3.6{\%} (14/394) in the control arm (PRR=0.90, 95{\%} CI 0.43 to 1.89, p=0.78). In an as-treated analysis, the prevalence of M genitalium was 3.4{\%} in female partners of circumcised men and 3.3{\%} in female partners of uncircumcised men (PRR=1.01, 95{\%} CI 0.48to 2.12, p=0.97). Conclusions: Contrary to findings in men, male circumcision did not affect M genitalium infection in female partners.",
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T2 - A randomised trial in rakai, uganda

AU - Tobian, Aaron A

AU - Gaydos, Charlotte A

AU - Gray, Ronald H

AU - Kigozi, Godfrey

AU - Serwadda, David

AU - Quinn, Nicole

AU - Grabowski, Mary

AU - Musoke, Richard

AU - Ndyanabo, Anthony

AU - Nalugoda, Fred

AU - Wawer, Maria J

AU - Quinn, Thomas C

PY - 2014

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N2 - Objective: Previous randomised trial data have demonstrated that male circumcision reduces Mycoplasma genitalium prevalence in men. We assessed whether male circumcision also reduces M genitalium infection in female partners of circumcised men. Methods: HIV-negative men were enrolled and randomised to either male circumcision or control. Female partners of male trial participants from the intervention (n=437) and control (n=394) arms provided interview information and self-collected vaginal swabs that were tested for M genitalium by APTIMA transcription-mediated amplification-based assay. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) and 95% CI of M genitalium prevalence in intervention versus control group were estimated using Poisson regression. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. An as-treated analysis was conducted to account for study-group crossovers. Results: Male and female partner enrolment sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviours, and symptoms of sexually transmitted infections were similar between study arms. Female M genitalium prevalence at year 2 was 3.2% (14/437) in the intervention arm and 3.6% (14/394) in the control arm (PRR=0.90, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.89, p=0.78). In an as-treated analysis, the prevalence of M genitalium was 3.4% in female partners of circumcised men and 3.3% in female partners of uncircumcised men (PRR=1.01, 95% CI 0.48to 2.12, p=0.97). Conclusions: Contrary to findings in men, male circumcision did not affect M genitalium infection in female partners.

AB - Objective: Previous randomised trial data have demonstrated that male circumcision reduces Mycoplasma genitalium prevalence in men. We assessed whether male circumcision also reduces M genitalium infection in female partners of circumcised men. Methods: HIV-negative men were enrolled and randomised to either male circumcision or control. Female partners of male trial participants from the intervention (n=437) and control (n=394) arms provided interview information and self-collected vaginal swabs that were tested for M genitalium by APTIMA transcription-mediated amplification-based assay. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) and 95% CI of M genitalium prevalence in intervention versus control group were estimated using Poisson regression. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. An as-treated analysis was conducted to account for study-group crossovers. Results: Male and female partner enrolment sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviours, and symptoms of sexually transmitted infections were similar between study arms. Female M genitalium prevalence at year 2 was 3.2% (14/437) in the intervention arm and 3.6% (14/394) in the control arm (PRR=0.90, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.89, p=0.78). In an as-treated analysis, the prevalence of M genitalium was 3.4% in female partners of circumcised men and 3.3% in female partners of uncircumcised men (PRR=1.01, 95% CI 0.48to 2.12, p=0.97). Conclusions: Contrary to findings in men, male circumcision did not affect M genitalium infection in female partners.

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