Making a difference in adult-child relationships: Evidence from an adult-child communication intervention in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique

Hilary M. Schwandt, Carol Underwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Girls are vulnerable to HIV in part because the social systems in which they live have failed to protect them. This study evaluates a program aimed at strengthening adult-child relationships to reduce girls' vulnerability to HIV in Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique. In addition to an extensive process evaluation, a cross-sectional post-intervention survey was conducted in the three countries. The total sample size was 1418 adolescent girls (ages 11-18). Bivariate and multilevel, multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the association between adult program exposure and adult-child relationship improvement. In Botswana, Malawi, and Mozambique, girls whose mothers and fathers participated in the program, as compared to those whose parents did not participate in the program, were significantly more likely to report that their relationships with their parents had improved. Research has shown the important role that adults can play in the mitigation of youth risk taking behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1177-1186
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Keywords

  • Adult-child communication
  • Adult-child relationships
  • Botswana
  • HIV
  • Malawi
  • Mozambique

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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