Major depression in Alzheimer's disease: An interaction between gender and family history

Constantine G. Lyketsos, Larry E. Tune, Godfrey Pearlson, Cynthia Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Major depression afflicts from 15% to 31% of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The charts of 137 patients with AD were reviewed to assess the association between several variables arid the risk of developing major depression. Thirty-eight patients (28%) had major depression. A family history of mood disorder was associated with a significantly increased risk for major depression, but this was only true in women (relative of odds = 2.82, 95 confidence interval from 1.19 to 6.69). There was no relationship between major depression and a personal history of depression, younger age at onset of AD, history of substance use disorder, institutionalization, and marital status. These results suggest that the relationship between family history and depression in AD is more complex than previously thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-384
Number of pages5
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Major depression in Alzheimer's disease: An interaction between gender and family history'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this