Magnitude and time course of platelet inhibition with Aggrenox® and Aspirin in patients after ischemic stroke

The AGgrenox versus Aspirin Therapy Evaluation (AGATE) trial

Victor L. Serebruany, Alex I. Malinin, David C. Sane, Bernd Jilma, Aviv Takserman, Dan Atar, Charles H. Hennekens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The European Stroke Prevention Study showed greater stroke prevention for Aggrenox® than either for aspirin or dipyridamole alone. To test whether Aggrenox® has superior antiplatelet properties to aspirin alone we conducted the AGgrenox versus Aspirin Therapy Evaluation (AGATE) trial. Forty patients with prior ischemic stroke not taking aspirin for at least 30 days were randomized to Aggrenox® (2 pills/daily) or aspirin (81 mg plus matching placebo/daily) for 30 days. Platelet function was assessed at baseline, 24 h, and days 3, 7, 15, and 30 by aggregometry, flow cytometry and cartridge-based analyzers. Both Aggrenox® and aspirin provided fast and sustained platelet inhibition. Aggrenox®, however, especially after 15 days, showed significant prolongation of the closure time (P=0.04), diminished expression of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) (P=0.01), glycoprotein IIb (GPIIb) antigen (P=0.02), and GPIIb/IIIa activity (P=0.01) by PAC-1 C antibody, CD63 (P=0.03), as well as inhibition of Protease Activated Receptors (PAR-1) associated with intact (SPAN12, P=0.01) and cleaved (WEDE15, P=0.01) thrombin receptors as compared with aspirin. Surprisingly, GPIb expression increased, especially after aspirin. In the randomized trial of small sample size, aspirin and Aggrenox® produced fast and sustained platelet inhibition. In 25 of 90 direct comparisons, Aggrenox® was superior to aspirin, whereas in 4 of 90, aspirin was superior to Aggrenox®. In 61 of 90 direct comparisons, aspirin and Aggrenox® were equivalent. Aggrenox® was associated with a profound reduction of PAR-1 receptors, an observation that may be related to the greater clinical benefit of Aggrenox® compared with Aspirin in preventing recurrent stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-324
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume499
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 24 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aspirin
Blood Platelets
Stroke
Therapeutics
PAR-1 Receptor
P-Glycoprotein
Dipyridamole Drug Combination Aspirin
CD31 Antigens
Thrombin Receptors
Dipyridamole
Sample Size
Flow Cytometry
Placebos
Observation
Antigens

Keywords

  • Aggrenox®
  • Aspirin
  • Platelet
  • Randomized trial
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Magnitude and time course of platelet inhibition with Aggrenox® and Aspirin in patients after ischemic stroke : The AGgrenox versus Aspirin Therapy Evaluation (AGATE) trial. / Serebruany, Victor L.; Malinin, Alex I.; Sane, David C.; Jilma, Bernd; Takserman, Aviv; Atar, Dan; Hennekens, Charles H.

In: European Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 499, No. 3, 24.09.2004, p. 315-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Serebruany, Victor L. ; Malinin, Alex I. ; Sane, David C. ; Jilma, Bernd ; Takserman, Aviv ; Atar, Dan ; Hennekens, Charles H. / Magnitude and time course of platelet inhibition with Aggrenox® and Aspirin in patients after ischemic stroke : The AGgrenox versus Aspirin Therapy Evaluation (AGATE) trial. In: European Journal of Pharmacology. 2004 ; Vol. 499, No. 3. pp. 315-324.
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