Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the upper gastrointestinal tract using an endoluminal coil: Feasibility and potential of a novel approach

Pankaj Jay Pasricha, Anthony N Kalloo, R. L. Huang, R. Aggarwal, E. A. Zehrouni, E. Atalar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In contrast to most other imaging techniques, MRI can provide 3-dimensional tomography of the gut and surrounding structures. The use of a radiofrequency (RF) coil within the lumen of the gut increases the signal to noise (S/N) ratio with the potential of enhanced images of intramural structures as well as greater accuracy in identifying lesions in extraluminal organs eg lymph nodes and pancreas. Until now, however, the use of an endoluminal RF coil has been restricted to imaging the prostate. Methods. We have developed a new prototype quadrature RF coil that can be easily inserted through the mouth or nose into the esophagus and stomach. The coil is long, narrow and flexible. It is sensitive to magnetic resonance signal at any orientation with respect to the main magnetic field. Results. Preliminary use of this coil in pigs has been encouraging. Sharp images of the esophagus and stomach are observed, permitting ready differentiation of a 3-layered (mucosa, submucosa and muscularis) wall structure. Further refinements in this system are expected to permit identification of lesions in lymph nodes and neighboring organs. Conclusions. Because of its ease of use and ability for multiplanar imaging, this technique appears to provide a feasible alternative to endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for upper gastrointestinal lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301
Number of pages1
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume43
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1996

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Upper Gastrointestinal Tract
Esophagus
Stomach
Lymph Nodes
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Magnetic Fields
Nose
Mouth
Prostate
Pancreas
Mucous Membrane
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Swine
Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the upper gastrointestinal tract using an endoluminal coil : Feasibility and potential of a novel approach. / Pasricha, Pankaj Jay; Kalloo, Anthony N; Huang, R. L.; Aggarwal, R.; Zehrouni, E. A.; Atalar, E.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 43, No. 4, 1996, p. 301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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