Magnetic hyperthermia therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma: a review of the therapy’s history, efficacy and application in humans

Keon Mahmoudi, Alexandros Bouras, Dominique Bozec, Robert Ivkov, Constantinos Hadjipanayis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Hyperthermia therapy (HT) is the exposure of a region of the body to elevated temperatures to achieve a therapeutic effect. HT anticancer properties and its potential as a cancer treatment have been studied for decades. Techniques used to achieve a localised hyperthermic effect include radiofrequency, ultrasound, microwave, laser and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The use of MNPs for therapeutic hyperthermia generation is known as magnetic hyperthermia therapy (MHT) and was first attempted as a cancer therapy in 1957. However, despite more recent advancements, MHT has still not become part of the standard of care for cancer treatment. Certain challenges, such as accurate thermometry within the tumour mass and precise tumour heating, preclude its widespread application as a treatment modality for cancer. MHT is especially attractive for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and aggressive primary brain cancer in adults, which has no cure. In this review, the application of MHT as a therapeutic modality for GBM will be discussed. Its therapeutic efficacy, technical details, and major experimental and clinical findings will be reviewed and analysed. Finally, current limitations, areas of improvement, and future directions will be discussed in depth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1316-1328
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Hyperthermia
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 2018

Fingerprint

Glioblastoma
Fever
History
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Nanoparticles
Implosive Therapy
Thermometry
Body Regions
Induced Hyperthermia
Therapeutic Uses
Standard of Care
Microwaves
Brain Neoplasms
Heating
Lasers

Keywords

  • alternating magnetic field
  • convection enhanced delivery
  • glioblastoma
  • Magnetic hyperthermia therapy
  • magnetic nanoparticles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Magnetic hyperthermia therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma : a review of the therapy’s history, efficacy and application in humans. / Mahmoudi, Keon; Bouras, Alexandros; Bozec, Dominique; Ivkov, Robert; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos.

In: International Journal of Hyperthermia, Vol. 34, No. 8, 17.11.2018, p. 1316-1328.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mahmoudi, Keon ; Bouras, Alexandros ; Bozec, Dominique ; Ivkov, Robert ; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos. / Magnetic hyperthermia therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma : a review of the therapy’s history, efficacy and application in humans. In: International Journal of Hyperthermia. 2018 ; Vol. 34, No. 8. pp. 1316-1328.
@article{97cc4714f747434bb816c0f212b69159,
title = "Magnetic hyperthermia therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma: a review of the therapy’s history, efficacy and application in humans",
abstract = "Hyperthermia therapy (HT) is the exposure of a region of the body to elevated temperatures to achieve a therapeutic effect. HT anticancer properties and its potential as a cancer treatment have been studied for decades. Techniques used to achieve a localised hyperthermic effect include radiofrequency, ultrasound, microwave, laser and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The use of MNPs for therapeutic hyperthermia generation is known as magnetic hyperthermia therapy (MHT) and was first attempted as a cancer therapy in 1957. However, despite more recent advancements, MHT has still not become part of the standard of care for cancer treatment. Certain challenges, such as accurate thermometry within the tumour mass and precise tumour heating, preclude its widespread application as a treatment modality for cancer. MHT is especially attractive for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and aggressive primary brain cancer in adults, which has no cure. In this review, the application of MHT as a therapeutic modality for GBM will be discussed. Its therapeutic efficacy, technical details, and major experimental and clinical findings will be reviewed and analysed. Finally, current limitations, areas of improvement, and future directions will be discussed in depth.",
keywords = "alternating magnetic field, convection enhanced delivery, glioblastoma, Magnetic hyperthermia therapy, magnetic nanoparticles",
author = "Keon Mahmoudi and Alexandros Bouras and Dominique Bozec and Robert Ivkov and Constantinos Hadjipanayis",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1080/02656736.2018.1430867",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "1316--1328",
journal = "International Journal of Hyperthermia",
issn = "0265-6736",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Magnetic hyperthermia therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma

T2 - a review of the therapy’s history, efficacy and application in humans

AU - Mahmoudi, Keon

AU - Bouras, Alexandros

AU - Bozec, Dominique

AU - Ivkov, Robert

AU - Hadjipanayis, Constantinos

PY - 2018/11/17

Y1 - 2018/11/17

N2 - Hyperthermia therapy (HT) is the exposure of a region of the body to elevated temperatures to achieve a therapeutic effect. HT anticancer properties and its potential as a cancer treatment have been studied for decades. Techniques used to achieve a localised hyperthermic effect include radiofrequency, ultrasound, microwave, laser and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The use of MNPs for therapeutic hyperthermia generation is known as magnetic hyperthermia therapy (MHT) and was first attempted as a cancer therapy in 1957. However, despite more recent advancements, MHT has still not become part of the standard of care for cancer treatment. Certain challenges, such as accurate thermometry within the tumour mass and precise tumour heating, preclude its widespread application as a treatment modality for cancer. MHT is especially attractive for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and aggressive primary brain cancer in adults, which has no cure. In this review, the application of MHT as a therapeutic modality for GBM will be discussed. Its therapeutic efficacy, technical details, and major experimental and clinical findings will be reviewed and analysed. Finally, current limitations, areas of improvement, and future directions will be discussed in depth.

AB - Hyperthermia therapy (HT) is the exposure of a region of the body to elevated temperatures to achieve a therapeutic effect. HT anticancer properties and its potential as a cancer treatment have been studied for decades. Techniques used to achieve a localised hyperthermic effect include radiofrequency, ultrasound, microwave, laser and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The use of MNPs for therapeutic hyperthermia generation is known as magnetic hyperthermia therapy (MHT) and was first attempted as a cancer therapy in 1957. However, despite more recent advancements, MHT has still not become part of the standard of care for cancer treatment. Certain challenges, such as accurate thermometry within the tumour mass and precise tumour heating, preclude its widespread application as a treatment modality for cancer. MHT is especially attractive for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and aggressive primary brain cancer in adults, which has no cure. In this review, the application of MHT as a therapeutic modality for GBM will be discussed. Its therapeutic efficacy, technical details, and major experimental and clinical findings will be reviewed and analysed. Finally, current limitations, areas of improvement, and future directions will be discussed in depth.

KW - alternating magnetic field

KW - convection enhanced delivery

KW - glioblastoma

KW - Magnetic hyperthermia therapy

KW - magnetic nanoparticles

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053336799&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053336799&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02656736.2018.1430867

DO - 10.1080/02656736.2018.1430867

M3 - Review article

C2 - 29353516

AN - SCOPUS:85053336799

VL - 34

SP - 1316

EP - 1328

JO - International Journal of Hyperthermia

JF - International Journal of Hyperthermia

SN - 0265-6736

IS - 8

ER -