Lung Function and Late Pulmonary Complications Among Survivors of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation During Childhood

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is used to treat an expanding array of malignant and non-malignant disorders. Pulmonary complications represent a significant source of morbidity and mortality in HSCT recipients. Young children, whose lungs are still developing and growing, may be especially susceptible to the insults of irradiation, drug toxicities, and recurrent infections associated with immunosuppression. Late pulmonary complications, those occurring more than three months after transplantation, are often noninfectious and present with nonspecific symptomatology. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) is a mainstay of monitoring pulmonary health in HSCT recipients. The pulmonologist should be familiar with common patterns seen on PFT in recipients of HSCT during childhood. In this review, we describe the findings in studies which have examined lung function over time in patients who underwent HSCT during childhood. We discuss patterns of PFT abnormalities, associated noninfectious syndromes and their clinical implications, as well as directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalPaediatric Respiratory Reviews
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • BMT
  • Bone marrow transplant
  • Exercise testing
  • HSCT
  • PFT
  • Pediatric
  • Pulmonary function testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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