Lung deposition versus inhalable sampling to estimate body burden of welding fume exposure: A pilot sampler study in stainless steel welders

Ashley Newton, Berrin Serdar, Karin Adams, L. Miriam Dickinson, Kirsten Koehler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This pilot study evaluated the ability of a lung deposition sampler (LDS) to estimate body burden by comparing lung-deposited and inhalable nickel and chromium exposures to biomarkers of internal dose. A cohort of stainless steel welders (N = 18) wore side-by-side inhalable and lung deposition samplers for two Monday shifts and urine samples were collected pre- and post-shift. Samplers were analyzed for inhalable and lung-deposited nickel and chromium and urine was analyzed for the respective biomarkers of internal dose. There were statistically significant relationships between lung-deposited nickel (βNi = 0.10; 95% CI = 0.05–0.16) and chromium (βCr = 0.07; 95% CI = 0.006–0.14) and their internal dose biomarkers. No relationship was found between inhalable metals and internal dose biomarkers. In moving towards a more physiologically relevant exposure metric, the LDS can provide better estimates for the total body burden of exposure than traditional penetration-based samplers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105721
JournalJournal of Aerosol Science
Volume153
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Lung deposition
  • Sampler validation
  • Welding aerosols

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Pollution
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Atmospheric Science

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