Low overdose responding self-efficacy among adults who report lifetime opioid use

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Evaluations of overdose response programs suggest effectiveness in preventing overdose-related death and individual willingness to respond to an overdose. However, knowledge of and confidence in performing response behaviors is necessary for individuals to intervene. This study assessed overdose responding self-efficacy among adults who reported lifetime opioid use. Methods: Data come from a cross-sectional survey, part of a randomized controlled trial designed for adults living with hepatitis C. Participants were 18 years old or older, and reported lifetime opioid use. Overdose responding self-efficacy was assessed by perceived knowledge and/or need for additional training to have confidence responding to an overdose. Univariate statistics were calculated for overdose responding self-efficacy, and individual characteristics and experiences. Adjusted logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with low overdose responding self-efficacy. Results: Of the 424 participants, 67.2% reported low overdose responding self-efficacy. Sixty percent witnessed and 30.4% experienced an overdose in the past year. Witnessing an overdose in the past year, experience with naloxone training, and receiving and using naloxone were associated with high overdose responding self-efficacy. While, apprehension with particular response behaviors (e.g. rescue breathing) was associated with low overdose responding self-efficacy. Conclusions: A large proportion of adults who reported lifetime opioid use did not feel confident or knowledgeable responding to an overdose. This could be influenced by overdose exposure, specific response behaviors, and response trainings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-146
Number of pages5
JournalDrug and alcohol dependence
Volume201
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Opioid Analgesics
Naloxone
Logistics
Statistics
Program Evaluation
Hepatitis C
Respiration
Randomized Controlled Trials
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Injection drug use
  • Naloxone
  • Opioid use
  • Overdose
  • Overdose response
  • Overdose response training
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Low overdose responding self-efficacy among adults who report lifetime opioid use. / Tormohlen, Kayla N.; Tobin, Karin E; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa; Latkin, Carl A.

In: Drug and alcohol dependence, Vol. 201, 01.08.2019, p. 142-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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